5 Causes of Thumb Pain

The thumb is involved in about 50% of all hand functions. When the thumb is painful or injured, it becomes very difficult to use the hand. During normal life, we take our thumbs for granted. When the thumb is not working properly, tasks are more difficult, and we then realize how important the thumb is. There are several causes of thumb pain including:

  1. Trigger thumb
  2. Arthritis
  3. Tendonitis
  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome
  5. Skier’s thumb.

Read below to learn more.

1. Trigger thumb

The tendon that bends or flexes the thumb is called the flexor pollicis longus (FPL). If there is swelling or inflammation around the thumb tendon, it will not glide smoothly. Sometimes the tendon gets stuck in the thumb pulley, causing the thumb joint to click, catch, or lock. This is called a trigger thumb. The thumb can also become swollen, stiff, and very painful. Treatment includes rest, anti-inflammatory medications, splinting, and steroid injections. Most patients improve without surgery. If symptoms persist with treatment, trigger thumb release surgery is very effective and has low risks.

2. Thumb arthritis

The human thumb is unique. We can touch the tip of the thumb to the small finger — a function called opposition. Most animals do not have an “opposable” thumb. This gives us the ability to write, use a needle and thread, and use hand tools. The joint at the base of the thumb which allows opposition is called the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint. Normal, every day activities can cause wear and tear in the thumb CMC joint. When the joint wears out, it can become inflamed and painful. This process is called osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease.

Anyone can get osteoarthritis if they live long enough. So far, we have not found a way to prevent osteoarthritis. Wear and tear is part of the normal aging process. However, the symptoms of osteoarthritis can be treated by reducing inflammation in the joint. Ways to reduce inflammation and treat thumb CMC osteoarthritis include topical anti-inflammatory gels, oral over-the-counter medications, adjusting hand activities, using a thumb splint, and steroid injections. Most patients improve without surgery. If symptoms persist with treatment, thumb CMC surgery can greatly improve quality of life.

3. DeQuervain’s tendonitis

The tendons in the wrist that lift the thumb up are prone to tendonitis. These tendons travel through a tight compartment on the thumb side of the wrist. If there is friction on the tendons, they can become inflamed and very painful. This is classic in young mothers, and is sometimes called mommy’s thumb. Treatment consists of splinting, anti-inflammatory medications, therapy, and steroid injections. DeQuervain’s release surgery is occasionally necessary to resolve this condition.

4. Carpal tunnel syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a type of pinched nerve. When the nerve is pinched in the carpal tunnel, patients have numbness and tingling in the thumb, index, middle, and/or ring fingers. Initially symptoms come and go, and are often worse at night. Some patients feel electric shock sensations or burning pain in their thumbs. In severe cases, the thumb muscles can become weak and atrophied. Treatment for most patients includes wearing a wrist brace at night, stretching exercises, hand therapy, and steroid injections. Carpal tunnel surgery is very effective for most patients if non-operative treatment is not successful or if nerve compression is severe.

5. Skier’s thumb

Trauma to the thumb is common. During a fall, most people land on an outstretched hand to brace themselves. Unfortunately the ligaments in the thumb can become injured in this way. The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb is vulnerable to tearing as the thumb is bent backwards and away from the hand. If this ligament does not heal properly, patients can have pain and weakness with pinch tasks. For most minor sprains of the thumb, temporary immobilization in a splint or cast is successful to allow healing. If the ulnar collateral ligament is fully torn, however, surgery is usually recommended to fix the injury. Hand therapy is often helpful during the recovery process to regain range of motion and strength.

If you have an injury to your hand or thumb, or pain which does not go away with conservative treatment, make an appointment with a hand specialist to get an accurate diagnosis and good treatment plan.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

10 Tips for Getting Around on Crutches

1. Verify Your Fit

Properly fitting crutches can make the difference between comfort and calluses. When you’re standing up straight with your arms at your side, the top of the crutches should be 1 to 2 inches below your armpit, and the handgrips should be at wrist-level. Your elbow should be slightly bent in this position. If your crutches don’t feel right after using them for a day or two, don’t hesitate to ask your care team for a different size.

2. Walk This Way

To walk, start standing up straight on your good leg with your crutches gripped in your hands. Lean onto your good leg, lift your crutches, and set them down 6 to 12 inches in front of your good foot. Lean your weight into your hands and step your good leg 6 to 12 inches in front of your crutches. Rest as necessary and repeat. Always look ahead—and not down—as you walk. Your body will follow your gaze.

3. Get a (Cushioned) Grip

Your hands—not your armpits—should bear your weight when you use crutches. If you push your crutches into your armpits, nerve damage could occur and send pain down your arms. If your hard-working hands become sore, cushion the handgrips with an adhesive pad. Or consider wearing fingerless gloves with padding if you need to walk a far distance.

4. Scan for Obstacles

You certainly don’t want to take a tumble while you’re on crutches and risk injuring another body part, like a wrist or your good leg’s ankle. While you’re walking, be on the lookout for ice patches, puddles, curled-up rug edges, gravel, and small steps. Think about how to safely and slowly get past your obstacle—or find another way to get where you’re going.

5. Use Care When Sitting

Sit down slowly every time. Transfer both crutches to the hand on the same side as your injured leg. Lean into your crutches, then reach back with your free hand to feel the chair, sofa, stool or bed. Sit down into the seat. Be sure to set your crutches down upside-down within reach. When standing up, slide to the edge of the your seat, and reverse these steps. Keep the back of your good leg touching the seat.

6. Sit Down on the Steps

If there’s an elevator to take you up and down floors, use it. But if you need to negotiate stairs on crutches, The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons recommends that you do so seated. That may feel odd, but it reduces your risk of a tumble and further injury. Be sure to push your crutches up or down in the direction you’re going before you start, so they’re available when you stand up again.

7. Contain Beverages and Foods

When you’re on crutches, carrying a cup of coffee or a sandwich to the couch can be a challenge without help. One way to do this on your own is to transport foods in closed travel containers, such as plastic containers or travel mugs. You can carry even more if you use a backpack or side-slung pack.

8. Equip Your Pad

You may spend more time at home than usual while your leg heals. So outfit your pad with props that save you time and effort. Use a wheeled office chair to roam the rooms of one level of your house. In the kitchen, set up a high, stable bar stool that you can lean on while you prepare food and drinks. And use (clean) trash grabbers or long barbeque tongs to pull small items down from tall shelves.

9. Care for Your Crutches

Once a week when you’re sitting down, check your crutches for anything that may weaken their support. Look for things like loose hardware, worn tips, and items like small rocks or stickers that have become lodged to the rubber ends. The more sturdy your crutches are, the more steady your pace will be.

10. Embrace Your Pace

You simply aren’t going to get around as quickly or as easily on crutches as you could before them. Give yourself plenty of time to get everywhere. And give yourself a pass on most of the items on your to-do list for a bit. The more slowly you go, and the more rest you give yourself and your injured leg, the more quickly you’ll regain strength and speed. And ultimately, you’ll recover quickly and safely.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

How to Stay Strong and Coordinated As You Age

Article featured on Harvard Health

So many physical abilities decline with normal aging, including strength, swiftness, and stamina. In addition to these muscle-related declines, there are also changes that occur in coordinating the movements of the body. Together, these changes mean that as you age, you may not be able to perform activities such as running to catch a bus, walking around the garden, carrying groceries into the house, keeping your balance on a slippery surface, or playing catch with your grandchildren as well as you used to. But do these activities have to deteriorate? Let’s look at why these declines happen — and what you can do to actually improve your strength and coordination.

Changes in strength

Changes in strength, swiftness, and stamina with age are all associated with decreasing muscle mass. Although there is not much decline in your muscles between ages 20 and 40, after age 40 there can be a decline of 1% to 2% per year in lean body mass and 1.5% to 5% per year in strength.

The loss of muscle mass is related to both a reduced number of muscle fibers and a reduction in fiber size. If the fibers become too small, they die. Fast-twitch muscle fibers shrink and die more rapidly than others, leading to a loss of muscle speed. In addition, the capacity for muscles to undergo repair also diminishes with age. One cause of these changes is decline in muscle-building hormones and growth factors including testosterone, estrogen, dehydroepiandrosterone (better known as DHEA), growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor.

Changes in coordination

Changes in coordination are less related to muscles and more related to the brain and nervous system. Multiple brain centers need to be, well, coordinated to allow you to do everything from hitting a golf ball to keeping a coffee cup steady as you walk across a room. This means that the wiring of the brain, the so-called white matter that connects the different brain regions, is crucial.

Unfortunately, most people in our society over age 60 who eat a western diet and don’t get enough exercise have some tiny “ministrokes” (also called microvascular or small vessel disease) in their white matter. Although the strokes are so small that they are not noticeable when they occur, they can disrupt the connections between important brain coordination centers such as the frontal lobe (which directs movements) and the cerebellum (which provides on-the-fly corrections to those movements as needed).

In addition, losing dopamine-producing cells is common as you get older, which can slow down your movements and reduce your coordination, so even if you don’t develop Parkinson’s disease, many people develop some of the abnormalities in movement seen in Parkinson’s.

Lastly, changes in vision — the “eye” side of hand-eye coordination — are also important. Eye diseases are much more common in older adults, including cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration. In addition, mild difficulty seeing can be the first sign of cognitive disorders of aging, including Lewy body disease and Alzheimer’s.

How to improve your strength and coordination

It turns out that one of the most important causes of reduced strength and coordination with aging is simply reduced levels of physical activity. There is a myth in our society that it is fine to do progressively less exercise the older you get. The truth is just the opposite! As you age, it becomes more important to exercise regularly — perhaps even increasing the amount of time you spend exercising to compensate for bodily changes in hormones and other factors that you cannot control. The good news is that participating in exercises to improve strength and coordination can help people of any age. (Note, however, that you may need to be more careful with your exercise activities as you age to prevent injuries. If you’re not sure what the best types of exercises are for you, ask your doctor or a physical therapist.)

Here are some things you can do to improve your strength and coordination, whether you are 18 or 88 years old:

  • Participate in aerobic exercise such as brisk walking, jogging, biking, swimming, or aerobic classes at least 30 minutes per day, five days per week.
  • Participate in exercise that helps with strength, balance, and flexibility at least two hours per week, such as yoga, tai chi, Pilates, and isometric weightlifting.
  • Practice sports that you want to improve at, such as golf, tennis, and basketball.
  • Take advantage of lessons from teachers and advice from coaches and trainers to improve your exercise skills.
  • Work with your doctor to treat diseases that can interfere with your ability to exercise, including orthopedic injuries, cataracts and other eye problems, and Parkinson’s and other movement disorders.
  • Fuel your brain and muscles with a Mediterranean menu of foods including fish, olive oil, avocados, fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, whole grains, and poultry. Eat other foods sparingly.
  • Sleep well — you can actually improve your skills overnight while you are sleeping.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

What You Need to Know About Torn Bicep Tendon Injuries

Your bicep is the muscle in the front of your upper arm. It helps you bend your elbow and twist your forearm.

Three tendons attach your bicep to bone:

  • The long head tendon attaches your bicep to the top of your shoulder socket.
  • The short head tendon attaches your bicep to a bump on your shoulder blade called the coracoid process.
  • A third tendon attaches your bicep to your radius, which is one of the bones in your forearms.

When you have a torn bicep, one of these tendons is damaged or detaches from the bone. Any of these three bicep tendons can tear.

Types of bicep tendon tear injuries

There are three types of bicep tendon tear injuries, categorized by their location and severity. Tears can also be partial (in which a tendon is damaged) or complete (in which the tendon completely detaches from the bone).

The three types of bicep tendon tear injuries are:

Proximal biceps tendon tear at shoulder

This injury occurs when one of the tendons that attaches the bicep to the shoulder tears. The long head tendon is more likely to tear than the short head tendon. This type of tear often starts as normal tendon fraying, but can also tear if you get injured.

It’s likely that only one part of the tendon will tear in this injury. This means that you can usually continue to use your arm. However, a bicep tendon tear at the shoulder may damage other parts of the shoulder at the same time.

Distal biceps tendonitis and tear at the elbow

A bicep tendon tear at the elbow usually happens when the elbow is pushed straight against a heavy weight. This stress can tear the tendon from the bone, and usually causes a complete tear.

When you tear your bicep tendon at the elbow, your other arm muscles will compensate, so you’ll still have full range of motion. However, your arm will most likely lose strength if the tendon is not repaired. Bicep tendon tears at the elbow are not common. They happen to approximately 3 to 5 people per 100,000 per year. They’re also less common in women. Distal biceps tendonitis is inflammation in the biceps tendon near the elbow. It’s usually caused by normal wear and tear but repetitive motion can make it worse.

Tendonitis (microtears from use)

Tendonitis is the inflammation or irritation of the long head of the bicep tendon. This can cause microtears. As with distal biceps tendonitis, tendonitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is usually due to normal wear and tear, but can also be made worse by repetitive motion. It often happens with other shoulder problems, such as arthritisshoulder impingement, and chronic shoulder dislocation.

Torn bicep tendon symptoms

Symptoms of a torn bicep tendon include:

  • a “pop” or tearing sensation when the injury happens
  • warmth around the injury
  • swelling
  • bruising
  • pain or ache at the injury site, and throughout your arm (usually severe at first, and may get better over a few weeks)
  • arm weakness
  • difficulty turning your palm
  • fatigue or increased pain in your arm when you do repetitive activity
  • bulge in your upper arm, because the bicep is no longer being held in place (you might also see a gap or indentation in front of your elbow)

Causes of a torn bicep tendon

The two main causes of a torn bicep tendon are injury and overuse. Injuries might be caused by lifting something heavy or falling on your arm. Most tears of the elbow bicep tendon happen because of an injury.

Overuse can cause the tendons to wear down or fray over time. This happens naturally as you age. It may also be made worse by repetitive motion, and is common in people who participate in sports such as weightlifting, tennis, or swimming.

Diagnosing a torn bicep tendon

To diagnose a torn bicep tendon, a doctor will first take a medical history. They’ll ask about your symptoms, whether you had any recent injuries, and when the pain began.

Then they’ll do a physical exam to test your range of motion and strength. During these tests, they’ll see if you have pain or difficulty with certain movements, especially rotations. They’ll also look at your arm for swelling, bruising, or bulging.

A history and physical exam are often enough to diagnose a bicep tendon tear. However, your doctor might also do an X-ray to help rule out any bone injuries, or an MRI to see if the tear is partial or complete.

Torn bicep treatment

Treatment for a torn bicep will mostly depend on how severe the tear is, as well as your overall bicep function and whether you damaged any other body part, such as your rotator cuff. Potential treatments include:

Rest

Taking time off from exercising, lifting, or holding anything heavy — and using your arm as little as possible — can help you recover, especially from overuse injuries. Be sure to avoid any activity that causes pain, even if it doesn’t seem strenuous.

NSAIDs

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are over-the-counter medications that help reduce inflammation. They can help reduce the inflammation (the hallmark of tendonitis), as well as help reduce swelling from bicep tears. They can also help reduce the pain you might have from any bicep tendon injuries.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy can help you regain strength and range of motion after a bicep tendon injury. A physical therapist will take you through a series of motions designed to help heal your injury and relieve pain.

A physical therapist or your doctor might also give you exercises to do at home when you’re healed enough to do so. These might include exercises to flex and extend your arm, arm rotations, and strength-building exercises like bicep curls.

Torn bicep surgery

If none of the measures above help your bicep injury heal, or if more than half the tendon is torn, your doctor might recommend surgery to repair the bicep tendon.

Many doctors will recommend surgery as a first-line treatment for bicep tendon tears at the elbow, although surgery can also be done later if other treatments don’t restore range of motion and strength.

Surgery is used to reattach the tendon to the bone. Complications of surgery are rare, but may include arm numbness or weakness. In some people, the tendon can tear again.

Torn bicep tendon recovery time

Recovery time depends on the severity of the bicep tendon tear, as well as type of treatment. Even mild injuries can take at least two months to heal. It often takes four to five months before you can start returning to normal activities.

After surgery, you’ll probably need to wear a sling or otherwise immobilize your arm such as in a splint or cast for four to six weeks. You’ll then have to do physical therapy and exercises to help strengthen your arm and improve range of motion.

Complete recovery from surgery can take up to a year, although most people recover much of their range of motion and strength in four to six months.

Takeaway

Bicep tendon tears can be serious, but many respond to nonsurgical treatment, such as rest and physical therapy. If you think you might have injured your bicep tendon, see a doctor as soon as possible. Getting a diagnosis and treatment early can help you recover more fully.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Why You Shouldn’t Ignore Joint Pain

If you have sudden or ongoing pain in your knee, hip or shoulder, you may wonder when it’s time to seek medical care for your joint problem. You may be able to manage pain on your own for a while, but how do you know if joint pain is a sign of a serious problem that needs care?

When should you seek care for joint pain?

If you have joint pain or mobility issues, it’s important to contact an orthopedic expert who specializes in treating conditions that affect the muscles, bones, joints and connective tissues.

Joint symptoms can be addressed through a range of treatment options and making an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon is often the first step in finding relief. Some of the reasons to see an orthopedic surgeon include:

  • New joint pain that isn’t getting better on its own
  • Chronic joint pain that has lasted for months or years
  • Limited mobility, such as difficulty walking, climbing stairs or reaching above your head
  • Difficulty changing position, such as moving from a sitting position to a standing position
  • New use of a cane, walker or wheelchair due to your joint pain or mobility issues
  • Severe pain that may wake you at night
  • Regular use of over-the-counter medications to manage your joint pain
  • Changes to a joint’s appearance, like a straight leg that has begun to bow

“You shouldn’t have to live with joint pain,” says Jeffrey Lange, MD, a hip and knee surgeon at the Center for Joint Health and Mobility at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “If something is wrong, call us to be evaluated. Every evaluation is different, because every patient is unique.”

Delaying joint care can lead to injury and other problems

For patients who have joint pain or mobility issues, it’s important to stay current with your joint health. In some cases, ignoring joint pain for too long may increase pain or mobility problems, or even result in a fall or injury.

“The more proactive you are in preserving your joints, the longer we anticipate they will last,” says Dr. Lange. “Taking care of your joint pain early could delay or prevent the need for surgery. If you do need surgery, having surgery earlier can lead to better outcomes in many cases. The details differ for every person, which is why we always suggest having an evaluation with a clinician to better understand your own unique situation.”

A check-in with your orthopedic specialist can help you understand all the available options for your unique situation. Together, you and your orthopedic specialist can:

  • Address your joint symptoms and concerns
  • Review or order imaging, such as an X-ray or an MRI
  • Discuss exercises or other lifestyle changes that can reduce pain and improve mobility
  • Discuss the role of pain medicine
  • Schedule a cortisone injection to help relieve pain and inflammation in a joint
  • Pursue a referral to physical therapy
  • Discuss joint replacement surgery or another procedure
  • Discuss the risks and benefits of continuing care versus waiting for a period of time

Benefits of virtual care for joint problems

A consultation with an orthopedic specialist can be done in-person or virtually. A virtual visit allows you to accomplish many of the same things you would review during an in-person visit. Many patients are realizing the benefits of virtual care for joint problems, including:

  • Convenience: Patients don’t have to drive to the clinic or hospital. This is particularly helpful for orthopedic patients who may be in pain or who have limited mobility.
  • Saving time: The average virtual visit lasts about 20-30 minutes and doesn’t involve the time needed to do things like travel to an appointment and find your doctor’s office.
  • Connection: Many patients have been able to maintain strong emotional connections with their providers during virtual visits.

“Going to the doctor’s office used to be a half- or even full-day affair for some patients,” says Dr. Lange. “With a virtual visit, patients can meet with me for a short period of time from the comfort of their homes. They feel like they are still connected with their provider without having to put themselves at risk by leaving their home during this difficult time.”

Safe care for joint pain during COVID-19

While many knee, hip and shoulder problems can be addressed remotely, your orthopedic specialist may want to see you in person for a follow-up evaluation. If you need to visit the clinic, your provider can give you an overview of what to expect during your in-person meeting.

Guided by our Safe Care Commitment, the Center for Joint Health and Mobility has put many safety measures in place to provide the safest possible environment for patients during COVID-19. If you need to visit the clinic for an in-person visit, you will encounter the following safety protocols designed to protect patients and staff:

  • A universal masking policy that requires all patients and staff to wear a face mask
  • Screening of all patients and staff to confirm they don’t have symptoms of COVID-19
  • Spacing of furniture in waiting rooms and other common spaces to maximize physical distancing
  • Signage that directs foot traffic and optimizes the flow of staff and patients
  • Fewer patients in waiting rooms and fewer providers in clinical spaces at any one time
  • Regular deep cleaning of clinical spaces, waiting rooms and frequently-touched surfaces
  • Cleaning and disinfecting of exam rooms after each visit

Patients who are admitted to the hospital for an orthopedic surgery are required to get a COVID-19 test prior to their scheduled procedure. Patients who test positive for the coronavirus must reschedule their operation.

“Many patients who have joint replacement surgery during the pandemic choose to go home on the same day of their procedure,” says Dr. Lange. “Patients can stay in the hospital after their procedure if they choose, but patients who qualify for a same-day surgery have the option to go home faster if they want.”

Patient-centered approach to caring for your joints

The Center for Joint Health and Mobility at the Brigham is home to expert orthopedic specialists who combine advanced treatments with a modern and personalized approach to manage your joint health.

“We’re not just a joint replacement center, we’re a joint health center,” says Dr. Lange. “We provide a single center where patients can get all of their joint health needs in one place, from rehabilitation specialists to joint replacement surgeons. We take a holistic approach to keeping your joints healthy and in optimal condition for as long as possible.”


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Bone Fractures: 10 Things Doctors Want You to Know

Mending Your Bone Fracture: What Doctors Say

About 6 million people break bones in the United States every year. The most frequently broken bone is the clavicle, or collarbone. Other common bone fractures include those in the arms, wrists and ankles. If you’re over 65, you’re more likely to break your hip than any other bone. You can break bones due to injury or diseases like osteoporosis, which weakens bones. Orthopedic surgeons specialize in treating broken bones in all scenarios. Here’s what three board-certified orthopedists want you to know about bone fractures, risk factors associated with them, and tips for helping them heal properly.

1. “A fracture and a break are the same thing.”

Patients frequently think bone fractures and bone breaks are different. Sometimes people think “fracture” means a crack while “break” means a clearly separated bone, but this is not true. “Fracture” is simply the term doctors use to refer to any break or crack in a bone.

2. “If you smoke, your fracture might not heal as fast.”

If you ingest nicotine—whether through cigarettes, cigars, chew tobacco, or even the nicotine patch—you may find that your fracture takes longer to heal than for a non-smoker. This is due to the effect of nicotine on the healing process. If you quit smoking, it will take three months before your body responds to bone breaks like a non-smoker’s would.

3. “Try RICE for non-emergency injuries.”

If you have a broken bone cutting through your skin or your bones are looking crooked and weird (what doctors call a deformity), you need emergency medical care. But if you only have pain and swelling, and aren’t sure if it’s a break, he says, you could try treating your injury at home for a day or two with “RICE”: rest, ice, compression (wrapping with an ace-type bandage) and elevation. If that doesn’t work, then you can be seen by a doctor.

4. “Don’t wait too long to be seen.”

If you wait too long to bring your possible bone fracture to your doctor’s attention, your bone could start healing on its own—and possibly in a crooked way. That makes fixing the problem more difficult than if you’d come in earlier. Or you could have underlying damage to the surface of the joint or other problems that are harder to treat the longer you wait. Waiting can also make it more likely you’ll need surgery. For non-emergency fractures it is recommended patients be seen within a couple of days. If you require an operation, this gives you time to get it scheduled before bones start knitting back together (which usually happens within a few weeks).

5. “Even little fingers and toes need to be checked out.”

You crack your little toe against a table leg. Should you bother getting it checked for fracture? It depends how bad you feel, noting that in similar situations, he might wait a couple days and, if still in pain, see a doctor to have it X-rayed. But in general, it’s better to err on the side of caution and see your doctor. After all, broken toes that heal crookedly can cause your shoes not to fit right, resulting in pain. Similarly, ignoring finger fractures can cause “significant disability” and lead to longer surgeries once patients finally come in, he says.

6. “Moving it doesn’t mean it is not broken.”

Patients say they didn’t think their bone was broken because they could still move the affected body part. But, he says, this is a fallacy. There’s only one way to know if it’s broken and that’s with an X-ray. The idea that if I can move it, therefore it can’t be broken is ridiculous. You can almost always move it, even if it is broken. Signs that it could be a bone fracture include significant swelling, tenderness around the site, bruising, and an inability to bear weight on it even after a couple of days’ rest. 

7. “I don’t always operate.”

People think orthopedic surgeons do surgery 99% of the time. This can cause some patients to avoid seeing them, because they think they’ll wind up in the operating room. It’s perhaps an understandable misconception, given that “surgeon” is part of his title. But, most of what they do isn’t surgery. Instead, orthopedists do the least invasive procedures possible first to promote bone fracture healing, only moving up to surgery if more conservative measures don’t work.

8. “When we tell you to elevate it, take us seriously.”

Folks come in a couple of days after a broken ankle, for example, and they may have been laying around on the couch but not with the ankle truly elevated—which is above the level of your heart. If you’re lying down, you can put two or three pillows under your leg to achieve proper elevation, but if you’re sitting, you’re going to have to use more than that to get your leg high enough. Elevation is key to preventing swelling, which also could delay surgery, if that’s needed.

 9. “Splints are not second-class citizens.”

Casts are non-removable and go all around your broken bone, while splints go only halfway around and can be taken off and on. Both casts and splints are used to immobilize your broken bone and both can be written on and decorated. Yet some patients think casts are best and get disappointed if they get a splint instead. A lot of times patients don’t give the splint a lot of respect. Doctors use splints for several reasons, including when a cast is difficult to place due to the location of the break or when doctors want to leave room for swelling.

10. “Forget the ‘6-week rule’ of bone healing.”

Patients think they know fractures are cured in six weeks, which is an incredible piece of misinformation; no adult is going to heal in six weeks. Most bone fractures take anywhere from 2 to 6 months to heal, depending on many factors, he says. There’s not just one rule for every broken bone. It’s important to understand there is specificity and details matter, such as where a bone is broken, what bone it is, what the fracture pattern looks like, and so on. It’s difficult to generalize.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Ways to Improve Your Stamina

Article featured on Verywell fit

If you had to choose one—and only one—component of fitness to improve, what would you choose? You’re probably thinking you’d try to improve your strength, endurance, or speed, all of which are worthwhile goals to chase.

However, there’s one less-appreciated fitness factor that actually combines multiple components of fitness into one: stamina. If you want to most bang for your fitness buck, consider working to improve stamina.

What Is Stamina? 

Stamina is defined as “the ability to sustain prolonged physical or mental effort,” according to Oxford Dictionary. What this means in practical terms is that good stamina allows you to:

  • Run faster for longer distances
  • Lift heavier weights for more reps
  • Take longer, tougher hikes
  • Push through perceived pain, discomfort, and fatigue
  • Perform daily activities with high energy levels

The better your stamina, the more efficient you become at just about everything, mentally and physically.

Stamina vs. Endurance

People often use the words “stamina” and “endurance” interchangeably, and while the two terms are similar, they aren’t the same. Endurance is defined as “the fact or power of enduring an unpleasant or difficult process or situation without giving way,” and there are two types of endurance related to fitness: cardiovascular and muscular.

Cardiovascular endurance refers to the ability of your heart, lungs, and blood vessels to support rhythmic exercise such as swimming, cycling, and running. Muscular endurance refers to the ability of your muscles to sustain repetitive movements under a given load, such as during weightlifting or hiking. Both types of endurance are important and both represent a component of stamina.

Stamina vs. Strength

“Strength” has lots of different definitions, but in regard to fitness, it essentially defines how much weight you can lift. People who are very strong can lift heavier weights and can also lift lighter weights for many reps. People with less strength can’t lift as much and may not be able to lift as many reps.

Strength training contributes to your stamina because it conditions your body to sustain movement under heavy loads.

Improving your strength even helps for endurance-focused exercises because the stronger your muscles, the better they can handle repetitive movements.

Stamina vs. Speed

Speed, as you probably know, refers to how fast or slow you move while walking, running, swimming, or performing other cardiovascular exercise. Genetics may influence speed more than they influence strength and endurance, although you can improve your speed with hard work just like you can improve any other part of your fitness.

Stamina mainly comprises endurance and strength, because the definition refers to your ability to sustain a given effort. The stronger you are, the more reps you’ll be able to lift with a given load. The better endurance you have, the longer you can sustain a given speed during a run. Stamina is less of a function of speed, but speed certainly still plays a role in your overall fitness.

How to Improve Your Stamina

The key concept here is to challenge yourself. If you’re trying to improve your stamina (or any aspect of your fitness) you’ll need to follow the “principle of progressive overload,” a physiological rule that explains how the body gets stronger, faster, and fitter.

To put it simply, the principle of progressive overload says that you won’t improve in any capacity if you keep doing the same workouts at the same intensity over and over again.

You must change something, be it frequency, intensity, volume, weight, distance, speed, or rest intervals.

For example, if you can barbell squat 10 reps at 100 pounds, you should next try to squat 12 reps at 100 pounds or 10 reps at 105 pounds. Small tweaks like this lead to significant improvements over time.

Here are 15 ways to change up your workout routine and induce improvements in your stamina. 

1. Go for Long Walks 

Here’s a simple way to improve your stamina: Simply move your body for long periods of time. Going for long walks of 30 to 60 minutes is a phenomenal way to build endurance, especially for beginners. Even advanced exercisers can enjoy the stamina-boosting effects of long-distance walking if they amp up the speed and intensity.

2. Add Running Intervals

If you don’t feel walking is enough to improve your stamina, try tossing in a few running intervals throughout your walk. Interval training is proven to be one of the best methods for improving overall fitness, at least in a time-efficient sense. Next time you head out for a walk, add a 30-second sprint every three or four minutes.

4. Increase Your Running Distance or Time

Go the distance for stamina. Since stamina is a combination of endurance, speed, and strength, challenge yourself to maintain your usual running pace for a minute longer. When you can do that, add another minute. Your stamina should continue to improve this way for a while, although everyone has limits on how far and fast they can run.

5. Run Hills and Stairs

If increasing your running distance or time doesn’t sound fun (we don’t blame you), vary the type of running instead.

If you live near hills or hiking trails, adding hill runs to your routine can make a huge difference in your stamina.

Alternatively, stairs and bleachers work, too. Running in an uphill manner challenges your lungs and legs alike.

6. Try High-Volume Weightlifting

Studies show that volume is the number-one variable in resistance training that improves fitness. Volume refers to the total load you lift in a given session, day, or week. It’s calculated by multiplying weight by reps.

For example, if you perform three sets of 10 squats at 100 pounds, find your total volume by multiplying three by 10 by 100. The total volume comes out to 3,000 pounds. In general, continually increasing your volume benefits your fitness.

7. Practice Isometric Exercises

Isometric exercise refers to any exercise during which muscles fiber, but don’t extend or contract. Planks and wall-sits are two good examples of isometric exercises. Incorporating isometric work into your fitness routine can teach your muscles to sustain a position under stress for longer periods of time.

8. Decrease Rest Intervals During Workouts

One surefire way to improve your stamina is to allow yourself less rest time (unless you’re lifting very heavy weights, in which case you should rest three to five minutes between sets for optimal strength gains).

Studies show that decreasing rest intervals while performing moderate- to high-intensity exercise increases physical performance and body composition.

Shortening your rest interval forces you to perform more work in less time, which in theory should support improvements in stamina.

9. Try Cycling 

Riding a bike in any fashion—mountain biking, road biking, or indoor cycling—can improve your stamina if you push the pace (and the terrain if you’re outside).

Indoor cycling in particular is proven to increase aerobic capacity, a major contributor to stamina, as well as other health markers.

Mountain biking may be more effective at increasing muscular endurance and power due to the increased and variable resistance.

10. Swap Cycling for Rowing

If you’re already an avid cycler, you may want to add rowing to your workout rotation. Scientists have long hypothesized that rowing is a more effective workout than cycling because rowing recruits more muscle groups in a more intense fashion. Rowing seems to improve cardiovascular capacity more than cycling, so next time you have the opportunity to hop on an erg, go for it!

11. Have Dance Parties 

Dancing is a phenomenal mode of exercise that will leave your lungs and muscles burning—and it’s fun! Dancing may also require you to assume new positions and challenge your range of motion, which can improve your overall fitness.

Several scientific studies have shown dancing to have significant impacts on health and fitness, from better mobility and balance to improved cardiovascular endurance. Dance as exercise may also increase adherence for some people, because the cost and transportation barriers to entry are low.

12. Play Sports

Again, destructuring your fitness routine could, if counterintuitively, improve your stamina and fitness. Most sports require complex skill sets that may be outside of your comfort zone. If you’re used to lifting weights, running, or other relatively monotonous movements, swapping one workout each week for a sports game is a great way to hone other physical skills.

For instance, a game of soccer includes sprinting, jogging, walking, cutting, kicking, dodging, and even throwing, depending on the position you play. The intermingling of these different movements provides a fun and challenging way to improve your stamina.

13. Listen to Music While Exercising

Everyone knows a good song can pump you up for your workout. Listening to music brings people joy and energy, and this remains true during exercise. Listening to upbeat music during your workout might boost your performance in a number of ways, from reducing your perception of fatigue, distracting you from the strain of your workout, and making exercise feel easier.

14. Drink Caffeine Before Exercising

If you’re looking for a one-off way to improve your stamina, consuming a bit of caffeine before your workout might help. Studies show that caffeine acts as a great pre-workout supplement, because it can increase your energy, mood, and physical capacities, although the effect seems to be more significant in men than women, and you should be careful not to become reliant on caffeine.

15. Add Meditation to Your Fitness Routine

Remember how we mentioned that the word “stamina” refers to both physical and mental pursuits? This is where that tidbit of information comes in. Adding mindfulness practices such as meditation, deep breathing, or yoga to your overall wellness routine might improve your mental stamina.

If you’re used to fast-paced, engaging workouts, mindfulness practices will challenge you to push through perceived boredom and handle stress, two factors that play a role in how long you’re able to exercise at a near-maximal level. In fact, a 2016 study in the journal Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that medical students reported improved mental stamina (less stress and improved patience and wellbeing) after six weeks of yoga and meditation.

Don’t Forget to Rest and Recover

Finally, make sure you have recovery days scheduled into your workout routine. Contrary to popular belief, the actual act of exercising isn’t what improves your fitness—it’s the repair and rebuild phase that does. If you perform an intense workout every single day, your body never gets the chance to recover, thus it never has the opportunity to repair your muscles. Rest days are critical to your improvement over time.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Chronic Inflammation and Your Joints

Article featured on Harvard Health Publishing

Why the immune system is sometimes the culprit in joint pain.

When you suffer a joint injury — maybe a banged-up knee or a twisted ankle — a little inflammation is part of the healing process. Puffy, red, tender joints may indicate that your immune system is working to remove damage and promote the growth of new tissue, a healthy kind of inflammation. But sometimes the immune system launches unhealthy, chronic inflammation in the joints, for no apparent reason. This leads to pain, stiffness, and joint damage known as inflammatory arthritis.

The attack on joints

It’s often unknown what triggers the immune system to unleash an assault on the joints, but we do know what the cells are up to once they’re in action.

“In a common type of inflammatory arthritis like rheumatoid arthritis, a variety of immune cells can be found in the lining and fluid of the joint. These cells attract other immune cells and together lead to thickening of the joint lining, new blood vessel formation, and — ultimately — joint damage,” says rheumatologist Dr. Robert Shmerling, medical editor of the Harvard Special Health Report Fighting Inflammation (/ui).

Chronic inflammation in the joints can damage cartilage, bones, tendons (which attach muscle to bones), or ligaments (which hold joints together); irritate nerves; and produce a long list of symptoms, including pain, swelling, and stiffness. The joint damage may be progressive and irreversible.

Types

There are many types of inflammatory arthritis. Common ones include these:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA): RA occurs when the immune system attacks the lining of the joints, especially in the hands, wrists, and feet. RA may also affect the heart, lungs, and eyes.
  • Gout: Gout is characterized by a buildup of uric acid, which can form crystals in the joints — especially in the big toe, and sometimes in the hands, wrists, or knees. The crystals activate a temporary inflammatory response that can become chronic.
  • Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD, or pseudogout): In CPPD, calcium crystals settle in the joints, especially the knee, wrist, shoulder, ankle, or elbow. Like the uric acid crystals in gout, the calcium crystals in CPPD prompt the body to respond with inflammation; over time, this may become chronic.
  • Psoriatic arthritis: About 30% of people with psoriasis (an autoimmune condition that causes raised patches of scaly skin) develop psoriatic arthritis, which can affect the knees, ankles, wrists, or fingers.

What about osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis, a wearing away of the smooth cartilage lining joints, has long been considered a noninflammatory form of arthritis. “But we now recognize that some inflammatory cells are present in osteoarthritis, although the inflammation is usually much less dramatic than in rheumatoid arthritis or other types of inflammatory arthritis,” Dr. Shmerling says.

The finding of mild chronic inflammation in osteoarthritis has been significant enough for researchers to begin investigating whether the condition can be treated with some of the same types of medications used to treat inflammatory arthritis.

Treatment

Many types of drugs are used to treat inflammatory arthritis. They include:

  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which reduce levels of prostaglandins — chemicals that promote inflammation
  • oral or injected steroids, which reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system
  • injections or intravenous infusions of nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which suppress the immune system
  • injections or infusions of biologic DMARDs, that suppress the immune system in a more targeted way than nonbiologic DMARDs
  • Janus kinase inhibitors, which interrupt inflammatory signals
  • drugs that lower uric acid levels (for gout).

Results with drug treatment are often good. “Medications to lower uric acid can essentially eliminate gout. And the development of newer drugs for rheumatoid arthritis, including biologics and Janus kinase inhibitors, makes it possible for far more people than in the past to experience remission and protection from ongoing joint damage,” Dr. Shmerling says.

Other ways to live with arthritis

Other ways to help reduce pain and inflammation include exercising, avoiding processed foods (which promote inflammation), reducing stress, not smoking, and getting enough sleep. Wearing a splint or brace on affected joints and seeking physical therapy may also ease your pain and keep you mobile and active.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Understanding Bone Fractures: The Basics

Article featured on WebMD

What Are Fractures?

A fracture is the medical term for a broken bone.
Fractures are common; the average person has two during a lifetime. They occur when the physical force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone itself.
Your risk of fracture depends, in part, on your age. Broken bones are very common in childhood, although children’s fractures are generally less complicated than fractures in adults. As you age, your bones become more brittle and you are more likely to suffer fractures from falls that would not occur when you were young.
There are many types of fractures, but the main categories are displaced, non-displaced, open, and closed. Displaced and non-displaced fractures refer to the alignment of the fractured bone.
In a displaced fracture, the bone snaps into two or more parts and moves so that the two ends are not lined up straight. If the bone is in many pieces, it is called a comminuted fracture. In a non-displaced fracture, the bone cracks either part or all of the way through, but does move and maintains its proper alignment.

A closed fracture is when the bone breaks but there is no puncture or open wound in the skin. An open fracture is one in which the bone breaks through the skin; it may then recede back into the wound and not be visible through the skin. This is an important difference from a closed fracture because with an open fracture there is a risk of a deep bone infection.
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Because of the unique properties of their bones, there are some defined fracture subtypes that present only in children. For example:

  • A greenstick fracture in which the bone is bent, but not broken all the way through
  • A buckle fracture results from compression of two bones driven into each other.
  • A growth plate fracture at the joint that can result in shorter bone length

These fracture subtypes can present in children and adults:

  • A comminuted fracture is when the bone breaks into several pieces
  • A transverse fracture is when the fracture line is perpendicular to the shaft (long part) of the bone.
  • An oblique fracture is when the break is on an angle through the bone
  • A pathologic fracture is caused by a disease that weakens the bone
  • A stress fracture is a hairline crack

The severity of a fracture depends upon the fracture subtype and location. Serious fractures can have dangerous complications if not treated promptly; possible complications include damage to blood vessels or nerves and infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) or surrounding tissue. Recuperation time varies depending on the age and health of the patient and the type of fracture. A minor fracture in a child may heal within a few weeks; a serious fracture in an older person may take months to heal.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Is My Hand Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome or Something Else?

Article featured on Spine-Health.
We all wake up sometimes with a numb and tingly hand. But ongoing hand pain and numbness can be a disabling problem that requires diagnosis and treatment.
Here are 3 of the main causes of hand pain and numbness—and tips for how you can tell them apart.

Medical illustration of the palmar view of the hand. Transverse carpal ligament, flexor tendons, and median nerve are labeled.

Carpal tunnel syndrome

When hand pain is experienced, it’s common to first suspect carpal tunnel syndrome. This condition is caused by the narrowing of a bony passageway in your wrist, which irritates or compresses the median nerve that runs through it.
Symptoms tend to be in the thumb, index finger, or middle finger, along the path of the median nerve. The pain may wake you up at night or be worse in the morning. In the early stages, shaking your hand may bring relief.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Another possible cause of hand pain and numbness is rheumatoid arthritis.
Hand pain from rheumatoid arthritis tends to be different from carpal tunnel syndrome in 2 main ways:

  1. It causes pain and stiffness in the large knuckles or joints of the wrist, rather than along a nerve path.
  2. Its pain is symmetrical, meaning it will affect both hands simultaneously.

Cervical radiculopathy caused by spine conditions

While it may not seem obvious, your hand pain and/or tingling may actually be caused by a problem in your neck.
The nerves that give sensation to your hands originate in your cervical spine. When one or more of the 8 nerve roots that exit the cervical spine become irritated, it causes pain and other neurological symptoms down the nerve path. This is known as cervical radiculopathy.
The most common conditions that can trigger radiculopathy include:

  • Cervical herniated disc
  • Cervical spinal stenosis
  • Cervical degenerative disc disease
  • Cervical osteoarthritis

Cervical radiculopathy pain can be mildly achy or sharp and stabbing. It can also cause numbness and/or pins-and-needles tingling sensations. Symptoms can affect different sections of the hand depending on what level of the spine is the source of the irritated nerve.
Since carpal tunnel syndrome and cervical radiculopathy can both affect the median nerve, it’s important to note one key difference: Carpal tunnel syndrome pain will only affect the hand and wrist. Cervical radiculopathy from the C6 spine level (where the median nerve originates) will often cause pain and symptoms along the arm and in the bicep, as well as in the hand.
Aside from these 3 causes, hand pain can also be caused by a variety of other conditions, including diabetes and nutritional issues.
The best way to tackle hand pain that doesn’t resolve is to see your doctor, who can diagnose the correct cause and start a treatment plan. Many conditions that cause hand pain are more easily treated if they’re caught early.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.