Symptoms & Solutions: Rotator Cuff Tears

Article featured on Arkansas Surgical Hospital

Rotator cuff tears are intensely painful injuries to the rotator cuff area, which is a group of muscles in the shoulder that allows you to make a wide range of movements. While a minor rotator cuff tear can be treated in various ways, a severely torn rotator cuff often requires surgery for a full recovery.

Most rotator cuff tears result from a single incident, such as a sports accident, a fall, or lifting something that’s too heavy. Sometimes, a tear can result from a bone spur in the shoulder. Rotator cuff tears are also prevalent in individuals who use repetitive motions, such as lifting boxes or reaching above their heads. For example, construction workers and delivery people often develop rotator cuff tears after years of overusing their shoulder joints.

Symptoms of a Torn Rotator Cuff Pain

The first and most noticeable sign of a rotator cuff tear is pain that can be excruciating. The pain will cover a large area, including the outside of your shoulder and upper arm. The discomfort increases when you lift your arm over your head and is usually worse when you’re trying to sleep. Because nerves run down the arm from the rotator cuff, some patients experience pain as far down as their elbow. A constant, dull throbbing or ache in the shoulder is also common.

Movement Limitations

If the rotator cuff is torn, it will be difficult to move your arm and shoulder normally. Simple activities like brushing your hair, getting dressed, and preparing food will cause a great deal of pain. Carrying even small items may be difficult because you don’t have a full range of motion.

Stiffness

Your shoulder becomes stiff and tender when you have a torn rotator cuff. If you stop moving your arm, the area will become even more inflexible. This complicates the situation since movement is painful but not moving the joint can lead to a stiff or frozen shoulder.

Weakness

When your rotator cuff is torn, your shoulder can’t support as much weight as it normally does. Lifting something even as light as a book or a mug of coffee may be difficult. Your grip may be weak, making it difficult to keep hold of things.

Treatment Options for a Torn Rotator Cuff

Rest, Ice, & Physical Therapy

If the tear is minimal, resting the area and periodically icing it to reduce the inflammation may be helpful. Doctors usually combine this method with physical therapy to promote movement and keep the area from stiffening and impacting your range of motion. After several days, ice may be alternated with heat to improve blood flow. Patients may want to use a sling to support the shoulder and minimize discomfort when they’re not in physical therapy. In addition, over-the-counter pain medications can alleviate shoulder pain.

Steroid Injections

For intense pain, steroid injections into the joint near the tear can reduce swelling and help you rest comfortably. These injections provide temporary relief so you can continue with physical therapy and sleep better. However, using them for too long or at high doses should be avoided to minimize the risk of weakening the damaged tendon.

Rotator Cuff Surgery

There are several surgical options for rotator cuff tears. And if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be the only option.

Your physician can help you determine whether surgery is the best option for you. If you have to use your arms to lift or reach over your head for work or sports, surgery may be a good idea. Other indications that rotator cuff repair surgery may be the right choice for you include:

  • Pain that has lasted at least 6 months
  • A tear resulting from an acute injury
  • A tear larger than 3 centimeters in an otherwise healthy tendon
  • Weakness, loss of function, or a limited range of motion that lasts several months

Types of Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears

Partial Rotator Cuff Repair

A partial rotator cuff repair is performed when the tendon is torn but hasn’t fully detached from the underlying bone. Part of the acromion bone—which is located on the scapula, or shoulder blade—is removed during the procedure. This gives the rotator cuff more room for movement.

Arthroscopic surgery is then performed to removed the inflamed bursa sac and smooth the frayed ends of the torn tendon. If needed, a damaged ligament may also be removed. This procedure is done through small incisions on the side and back of the shoulder.

Full Rotator Cuff Repair

A full rotator cuff repair surgery is needed if the tendon has torn through completely or is completely detached from the humerus, or upper arm bone. A full rotator cuff repair may be performed in a few different ways based on the extent of the damage.

  • Arthroscopic surgery: Small incisions are made in the back and side of the shoulder, debris is flushed out with a saline solution, and the surgeon removes any damage such as bone spurs. Then, the tendon is reattached the humerus with suture anchors.
  • Open surgery: This is done only in cases of severe joint degeneration or severe injury. Bone and tissue grafts from other areas of the body are used to replace damaged bone, cartilage, and tendons. The tendon is then reattached to the head of the humerus bone.
  • Mini-open surgery: This “in-between” option is sometimes done if the surgeon needs a larger incision than is used in arthroscopic surgery, but grafts or opening the entire shoulder joint aren’t required.

Get Help for Your Torn Rotator Cuff

If shoulder pain and limited movement impact your daily life, it’s essential to see a doctor who’s familiar with the treatment options for rotator cuff tears.

Physicians will use x-rays, MRIs, arthroscopy, and other tools, combined with a physical exam, to determine the extent of the damage and advise you on your treatment options.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Orthopedic Soft Tissue Repair Market Projected to have a Stable Growth for the Next Few Years

Article featured on Orthogate
North America had the largest share in global orthopedic soft tissue repair market in 2014, attributed to the increase in sports injury cases due to high share of sports activity in this region.
A soft tissue injury is the damage of ligaments, muscles and tendons of hip, knee, shoulder and elbow joint. A soft tissue injury usually occurs from a strain, sprain and continuous use of a particular part of the body and it can result in swelling, pain, bruising and loss of function. To cure soft tissue injury, the soft tissue repair procedure is used. On any soft tissue injury, Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation (PRICE) principle should be immediately applied to minimize the soft tissue damage and to reduce inflammation caused by it. One of the methods to diagnose soft tissue damage is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
On the basis of surgeries, the global orthopedic soft tissue repair market can be broadly segmented as vaginal prolapse, achilles tendinosis repair, lateral epicondylitis, rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament and gluteal tendon. On the basis of applications, the global orthopedic soft tissue repair market can be broadly bifurcated as hernia repair, dental, dural repair, skin repair, vaginal sling procedures and breast reconstruction repair.
The rising trend towards safe and simple persistent surgeries and growth in number active lifestyle opting patients are driving the demand of the orthopedic soft tissue repair market. Moreover, with the increase in popularity of rough and energetic sports such as football, soccer and basketball, there had been a considerable increase in the number of soft tissue damages. Some of the factors driving the growth of orthopedic soft tissue repair market are rising geriatric population, increasing obesity rate, advanced medicinal technological advancements, and lack of substitutes.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Do I Need Surgery for a Rotator Cuff Problem?

Article featured on WebMD, Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on May 16, 2021

Some rotator cuff problems are easily treated at home. But if yours is severe, or lingers for more than a few months, you may need surgery.

What Causes Rotator Cuff Problems

Your rotator cuff is a group of tendons and muscles in your shoulder. It helps you lift and rotate your arm. It also helps keep your shoulder joint in place. But sometimes, the rotator cuff tendons tear or get pinched by the bones around them. An injury, like falling on your arm, can cause this to happen. But wear and tear over time can take its toll on your shoulder, too. The pain can be severe.

Treatment

Home care can treat many rotator cuff problems. Your doctor will tell you to rest your shoulder joint and ice the area. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help ease your pain and swelling while your rotator cuff heals. Physical therapy will help restore your shoulder strength.

What About Surgery?

If you’re not getting any relief with these steps, surgery may be the next option for you.
You may need surgery if:

  • Your shoulder hasn’t improved after 6 to 12 months
  • You’ve lost a lot of strength in your shoulder and find it painful to move
  • You have a tear in your rotator cuff tendon
  • You’re active and rely on your shoulder strength for your job or to play sports

What Type of Surgery Do I Need?

Surgery can relieve your pain and restore function to your shoulder. Some are done on an outpatient basis. For others, you may need to stay in a hospital.
The most common types are:
Arthroscopic repair. After making one or two very small cuts in your skin, a surgeon will insert a tiny camera called an arthroscope and special, thin tools into your shoulder. These will let them see which parts of your rotator cuff are damaged and how best to fix them.
Open tendon repair. This surgery has been around a long time. It was the first technique used to repair the rotator cuff. If you have a tear that’s very large or complex, your surgeon may choose this method.

A large incision is made in your shoulder, then your shoulder muscle is detached so the surgeon has direct access to your tendon. This is helpful if your tendon or shoulder joint needs to be replaced. Both of these surgeries can be done under general anesthesia, which allows you to sleep through the whole thing. They can also be done with a “regional block,” which allows you to stay awake while your arm and shoulder stay numb.You can talk to your doctor ahead of time about the type of anesthesia you prefer.

Recovery

Recovery from arthroscopic surgery is typically quicker than open tendon repair. Since open tendon repair is more involved, you may also have more pain right afterwards.
No matter which surgery you have, a full recovery will take time. You should expect to be in a sling for about 6 weeks. This protects your shoulder and gives your rotator cuff time to heal. Driving a car will be off limits for at least a month.

Most people don’t get instant pain relief from surgery. It may take a few months before your shoulder starts feeling better. Until then, your doctor will advise you to take over-the-counter pain relievers.
Physical therapy will be a key part of your recovery. Your doctor will give you exercises to do every day or you can work with a physical therapist. The movements you learn will help you regain your shoulder strength and range of motion.While the recovery from rotator cuff surgery can be a challenge, most people are back to their normal routine within 6 months.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

What to Know About Front Shoulder Pain

What to Know About Front Shoulder Pain

From Medical News Today; Medically reviewed by William Morrison, M.D. — Written by Sunali Wadehraon January 22, 2019

Damage to the shoulder may result from repetitive movements, manual labor, sports, or aging. A person may also injure this part of the body due to a bad fall or accident. Many people visit the doctor with front, or anterior, shoulder pain.

Read more

Exercises to Head Off a Painful Rotator Cuff Injury

Exercises to Head Off a Painful Rotator Cuff Injury

By Len Canter | Article Featured on US News

The rotator cuff refers to a group of four distinct muscles and tendons that connect to each shoulder and stabilize the humerus, the upper arm bone. These muscles are engaged when you move your shoulder, and work together to give you the needed range of motion to toss a ball or reach for an object on a high shelf.

Baseball pitchers and other athletes aren’t the only people who experience rotator cuff injuries. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons estimates that nearly 2 million Americans see a doctor about a rotator cuff problem every year. Strengthening this group of muscles can help enhance the stability of this important joint and help you avoid injury.

Alternating arm and leg lifts: Position yourself on all fours. Your arms are straight, with hands directly below your shoulders and your knees directly below your hips. Tighten your core muscles and simultaneously extend your left leg and your right arm straight out so that they’re both parallel to the floor. With control, lower them, and repeat 10 to 15 times. Then repeat the sequence with your right leg and left arm.

Stability ball pushups: Take pushups to another level by doing them with your hands on a stability ball. From the same position on all fours, place your hands on the ball, shoulder width apart, with your upper arms pressed against your sides. Straighten your legs, with toes flat on floor. Keeping your body in a straight line from head to feet, straighten your arms, pushing your body away from the ball. Hold briefly, then bend elbows to return to the start position. Repeat 10 to 15 times.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

best, orthopaedic doctors, albuquerque, nm

Rotator Cuff Surgery Recovery Timeline

Article Featured on Verywellhealth.com

Rotator cuff surgery is a common treatment for a torn rotator cuff. Most rotator cuff tears are treated without surgery, but there may be situations where surgery is the best treatment. In some cases, surgery is considered immediately after an injury, while in other situations, surgery is only the last step when all other treatments have failed.

Read more

5 Simple Exercises for Rotator Cuff Pain

Article by Kristen Barta | Featured on Health Line

As sports fans and athletes alike know, shoulder injuries are serious business. They can be extremely painful, limiting, and slow to heal. As physical therapist and founder of WebPT Heidi Jannenga explains, the rotator cuff is a common shoulder injury site, though there are plenty of exercises to help you recover.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that stabilize the shoulder and allow it to move. Jannenga says you should visualize the head of the arm bone as a golf ball, and the area of the shoulder blade as a golf tee: “The rotator cuff serves as a sleeve that enables the ball to spin and roll while remaining on the tee.”

Read more

5 Exercises for Rotator Cuff Pain

5 Exercises for Rotator Cuff Pain

What is a rotator cuff injury?

As sports fans and athletes alike know, shoulder injuries are serious business. They can be extremely painful, limiting, and slow to heal. As physical therapist and founder of WebPT Heidi Jannenga explains, the rotator cuff is a common shoulder injury site, though there are plenty of exercises to help you recover.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that stabilize the shoulder and allow it to move. Jannenga says you should visualize the head of the arm bone as a golf ball, and the area of the shoulder blade as a golf tee: “The rotator cuff serves as a sleeve that enables the ball to spin and roll while remaining on the tee.”

Read more