Importance of Posture in Maintaining Optimal Orthopedic Health

Article featured on Movement Orthopedics

Healthy posture is an often overlooked but incredibly important factor in maintaining overall orthopedic health and well-being. A well-aligned spine not only enables efficient movement and body mechanics, but also reduces the risk of injuries, pain associated with strained muscles, and disorders that result from chronic misalignment. Unfortunately, everyday habits such as prolonged sitting, working at a desk, or using digital devices can contribute to poor posture, disrupting the natural balance of your spine and leading to long-term orthopedic issues.

Our team of experienced professionals is dedicated to providing comprehensive preventive care and posture correction strategies for our patients, aiming to minimize the risk of posture-related issues and improve overall quality of life. In this informative guide, we will discuss the importance of good posture, explore common causes of poor posture, and share practical tips for incorporating healthy posture habits into your daily routine.

Understanding the Foundations of Healthy Posture

Healthy posture entails maintaining a balanced and well-aligned spine that allows for efficient body movement and minimizes undue stress on muscles, joints, and ligaments. The key elements of proper posture include:

1. Head Position: Your head should be level with your shoulders, with your chin held parallel to the floor and your ears directly above your shoulders. This positioning helps to reduce strain on your neck and upper back muscles.

2. Shoulder Alignment: Shoulders should be pulled back and down, away from your ears, with your shoulder blades resting flat against your back. This posture helps to prevent rounding and tightness in the upper back and shoulders.

3. Spinal Curvature: A healthy posture maintains the three natural curves of your spine. The cervical curve in the neck, the thoracic curve in the upper back, and the lumbar curve in the lower back should all be in proper alignment to minimize strain on the spine.

4. Pelvis Position: Proper posture includes maintaining a neutral pelvis, which prevents your lower back from overarching or becoming too flattened. This alignment can help protect your lumbar spine from strain and injury.

Common Causes of Poor Posture

Various factors can contribute to poor posture, ultimately impacting your orthopedic health. Some common causes include:

1. Prolonged Sitting: Sedentary habits, such as sitting for long periods, can lead to tightened hip flexors, weakened core muscles, and a rounded upper back – all contributing to poor posture.

2. Incorrect Ergonomics: Poorly designed workstations, inadequate chairs, or incorrect computer monitor placement can strain your neck, shoulders, and back, resulting in detrimental posture habits.

3. Digital Device Use: Frequent use of smartphones, tablets, or other digital devices can lead to a forward head posture, causing undue stress on the cervical spine and leading to a condition commonly known as “tech neck.”

4. Muscle Imbalances: Weak or tight muscles in certain body regions can cause imbalances and affect your overall posture. Common culprits include weak core muscles, tight chest muscles, and weak or overstretched back muscles.

Tips for Improving and Maintaining Healthy Posture

Implementing healthy posture habits in your daily routine can have a significant impact on your orthopedic well-being. Consider the following tips to improve and maintain a proper posture:

1. Mindful Awareness: Develop a conscious awareness of your posture during daily activities such as sitting, standing, or walking. Regularly check and correct your posture to reinforce healthy habits.

2. Adjust Your Workspace: Optimize your workstation’s ergonomics with an adjustable chair, proper monitor placement, and supportive desk setup to encourage better posture during work hours.

3. Take Frequent Breaks: Periodically stand up, stretch, and move around throughout the day to prevent muscle imbalances and maintain flexibility.

4. Strengthen Your Core: Regularly engage in strengthening exercises targeting your core muscles (abdominals, lower back, and pelvic floor). A strong core can help support a healthy posture and minimize stress on your spine.

5. Stay Active: Incorporate physical activity into your routine to maintain muscle strength, flexibility, and overall functionality – all key to a well-aligned posture.

Long-Term Effects of Poor Posture on Orthopedic Health

Neglecting the importance of healthy posture can have lasting repercussions on your orthopedic health, including:

1. Chronic Pain: Poor posture can lead to chronic pain in areas such as the neck, shoulders, and back as muscles, joints, and ligaments strain to compensate for misalignment.

2. Joint Dysfunction: Altered joint mechanics resulting from faulty posture can put undue stress on the joints, potentially leading to conditions like osteoarthritis, facet joint irritation, or ligament instability.

3. Reduced Mobility: Inadequate posture can contribute to muscle imbalances, stiffness, or limited flexibility, ultimately affecting your overall range of motion and the ability to engage in daily activities.

4. Increased Risk of Injury: Poor posture can leave you more susceptible to injuries, such as muscle strains, ligament sprains, or joint dislocations, due to compromised body mechanics.

Conclusion

The importance of maintaining healthy posture in promoting orthopedic wellness cannot be overstated. By incorporating practical postural habits into your daily routine and addressing underlying causes of poor posture, you can safeguard your long-term orthopedic health and enhance your overall quality of life. Don’t let poor posture compromise your orthopedic health.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Is It Possible to Prevent Arthritis?

Article featured on Harvard Health Publishing

Q. So many of my relatives and friends have arthritis. I have been fortunate so far. Is there any proven way to prevent it?

A. You may be able to lower your risk for three of the most common types of arthritis: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout. Here’s a brief description of each and how to possibly prevent them.

Osteoarthritis, the most common type, occurs when the cartilage of a joint erodes (breaks down). Bones begin to rub against each other, causing pain and difficulty moving the joint. It’s also the most common reason for knee and hip replacements. Take these steps to lower your risk:

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Osteoarthritis becomes more common with age and tends to run in families. But millions of cases might be prevented by avoiding excessive weight gain.
  • Avoid trauma. Injury also increases the risk of osteoarthritis. Some ways to avoid injury include exercising regularly, doing resistance training, and not taking unnecessary risks at work or at play.
  • Prevent and treat conditions that might contribute to joint damage like gout (see below) or an infection.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes pain, stiffness, warmth, redness, and swelling in joints. Over time, the affected joints may become misshapen, misaligned, and damaged. Rheumatoid arthritis usually occurs in a symmetrical pattern, meaning that if one knee or hand has it, the other usually does, too. Ways to reduce your risk of rheumatoid arthritis include avoiding tobacco and improving your oral health. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) caused by certain bacteria has been linked to many health conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care may lower the risk.

Gout occurs when crystals of uric acid get deposited in one or more joints and trigger inflammation that causes pain, swelling, and redness. You can reduce your risk by doing the following:

  • Eat a healthy diet. Avoid any foods that seem to trigger gout attacks, such as liver and sweetbreads. A heart-healthy diet such as the Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of gout in some people.
  • Limit alcohol. Stick to no more than one drink per day, and avoid binge drinking.
  • Stay well hydrated.
  • Lose weight if you are overweight or obese.
  • Avoid diuretics (water pills) if possible (but discuss all medication changes with your doctor).

If you notice joint pain, joint swelling, or difficulty doing activities, see your doctor. Early diagnosis and treatment can make a big difference in your future joint health.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Back Pain After Pregnancy

Article featured on Spine-Health

Persistent or newly developed pain in the lower back after pregnancy, also known as postpartum back pain, usually lasts for 6 months but may continue up to a decade. Postpartum back pain mostly occurs while performing activities that involve body movements, such as walking, lifting, bending, and/or carrying the new baby, and may be relieved with rest, exercise, and home treatments. The type and severity of pain depend on the underlying cause.

Causes of Postpartum Back Pain

The vast majority of women who experience postpartum back pain develop the symptoms due to pregnancy-related changes in the musculoskeletal system that persist after delivery. In some cases, women may undergo bodily trauma during childbirth that directly involves the lower back and pelvic bones, joints, and/or soft tissues, causing additional pain and discomfort. The type of delivery—vaginal, instrumental, or cesarean section (C-section) may also have a role to play in postpartum back pain.

Loss of muscle tone and joint instability

The effects of pregnancy on the muscles and joints in the lower body vary. A surge in the levels of relaxin, estrogen, and progesterone hormones causes considerable joint relaxation during pregnancy. After delivery, the levels of these hormones decline significantly, causing the joints to return to the pre-pregnant state. It takes an average of 6 to 8 weeks for the joints and surrounding tissues to stabilize and bear weight effectively.

The sudden decrease in hormone levels may cause localized and/or overall effects, such as:

  • A general feeling of tiredness
  • Activity intolerance
  • Pain in the lower back and hip
  • Back pain while walking or performing an exercise

If unsupported posture and body mechanics are used at this time, the risk of further trauma to the lower back and hip are higher.

Diastasis recti


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Preventing Repetitive Strain Injuries for Artists

Article featured on Practical Pain Management

Art therapy can be an effective and creative way to manage chronic pain. Just make sure you don’t add to your burden with repetitive strain injuries.

It’s no secret that art has profound benefits for mental health, including for people with a chronic pain condition, according to research such as this 2021 review published in Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy. But if you’re not careful, your art practice can lead to repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) and actually add to—not subtract from—your chronic pain burden.

Art-related RSIs may start with tingling, numbness, aching or the unsettling realization that you’re dropping things. One day, you wake up, and the pain has gone from annoying to excruciating.

What Are Repetitive Strain Injuries?

According to Joseph Herrera, DO, a physiatrist and the Lucy G. Moses Professor and Systems Chair for the Department of Rehabilitation and Human Performance for the Mount Sinai Health System in New York, N.Y., visual artists, craftspeople, graphic designers, weavers and sculptors, as well as other types of artists, are highly vulnerable to RSIs—often known as overuse injuries—particularly of the shoulder, elbow and hand.

These result from at least two factors – sitting in one position for protracted periods and performing the same movement repeatedly without taking a break. Prolonged immobility injures postural muscles that are needed to keep the body in that position; repetitive movement injures structures responsible for that movement. Other contributing factors include poor posture, use of tools which require force or cause vibration (such as those used in sculpting) and poor and/or working environments that are too cold. “There’s a reason that athletes warm up before starting,” says Dr. Herrera.

Types of Repetitive Strain Injuries

RSI is an umbrella term for a range of musculoskeletal disorders caused by repeated micro-trauma of the structural tissues of the body – nerves, tendons, muscles and ligaments. Artists may be especially prone to these types of conditions, which can include but are not limited to:

  • Tendinitis
  • DeQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis
  • Bursitis
  • Dupuytren’s contracture
  • Ganglion cysts
  • Rotator cuff injury
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Epicondylitis (tennis elbow or golfer’s elbow, depending on whether the pain is on the outside or the inside of the elbow)

Other conditions that can be related to or worsened by repetitive stress include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and thoracic outlet syndrome.

There are a number of other injuries that can plague artists and artisans.

Graphic artists and others who spend hours hunched over a computer are very likely to develop lower back and neck pain from sitting in one position or from craning the neck forward.

“Prolonged sitting or standing puts stress on the cervical or lumbar discs that are between each vertebra of the neck or lumbar spine.” says Dr. Herrera. “Because of the line of gravity and the position of the pelvis, lying down with a small pillow under your knees is actually the healthiest position for human beings.”

Renowned Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, who had multiple catastrophic injuries and numerous surgeries due to a serious bus accident, was able to paint lying down but most painters would find that extremely difficult, if not impossible.

Preventing Art Injuries

There is a great deal of overlap between prevention and treatment for overuse injuries.

Ergonomics is the applied science that focusses on designing and arranging things that will allow people to interact with them most efficiently and safely. Ergonomic chairs with lumbar supports, specially designed mice and keyboards, sitting-standing desks and numerous other items can be irreplaceable in terms of both comfort and prevention of injuries.

A 2018 University of Pittsburgh study published in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that people with chronic low back pain reduced their pain and disability by 50% using a sit-stand desk and taking movement breaks.

“Although making art is a passion-driven activity, and it’s difficult for artists to stop when they’re absorbed in what they’re doing, intermittent periods of rest are one of the best ways to prevent repetitive stress injuries,” says Dr. Herrera, who recommends a timed break within 30-40 minutes after beginning to work and at regular intervals after.

Good posture – maintaining a straight back, keeping your neck straight and your head up to prevent “tech neck,” having both feet on the floor when sitting – and proper body mechanics when lifting or moving heavy objects such as litho stones or bags of plaster or cement are important.

There are many adaptive devices which can be helpful. Pick and choose according to the type of art you make, the positions and instruments, if any, that you frequently use. There are pencil grip tools, angled drawing boards, triangular pencils, and jigs to hold vibrating tools instead of using your hands.

Stretching, with or without the use of stretching bands can also help with constricted circulation in a body part. Yoga, tai chi, and other movement activities can be useful and relaxing. However, during the acute phase of an injury, you should seek professional advice as to what kind of exercise is appropriate.

Splinting, braces, compression gloves and whole-arm immobilizers can help with both prevention and treatment of RSIs; it is crucial that these be correctly sized and appropriate to your body, any pre-existing injury or surgery and the way you work.

Treating Repetitive Stress Injuries

Early treatment of repetitive stress injuries is important not only to relieve inflammation and pain, but also to avoid making the injury worse, avoiding the need for surgery, and to lessen the risk for deformity or severe disability.

“The most important treatment is rest of the injured part,” emphasizes Dr. Herrera. “This is not a ‘no pain, no gain’ situation, and it is not the time to power through the pain. You must listen to your body.”

Over-the-counter analgesics such as acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen work by inhibiting the production of substances which causes pain, inflammation and fever, and are useful in relieving pain.

Applications of ice can help during the acute stages of an injury or if swelling is present.

Tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake Inhibitors (SNRI’s) may be used to treat pain and any accompanying depression.

Anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin (Lyrica) are useful in treating nerve-related pain.

Muscle relaxants and antispasmodics are typically used to ease acute pain associated with muscle tension and painful spasms, such as those often experienced with lower back pain. Steroid injections (such as cortisone) may be helpful. Opioids (used with caution) and medical marijuana are other options for pain relief.

Physical therapy, massage, trigger point massage, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulators and other pain-relieving devices can be used for either acute or chronic pain.

“Take good care of your body, be aware of potential risks, and utilize rest both prophylactically and when an injury is present. That is the best way to avoid having to come see me in my office,” says Dr. Herrera.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

A majority of Americans spend long periods of time sitting down while at work. Having an improper posture day after day can put those people at risk of chronic back pain, disorders, or future injuries. Read on to learn more about improving your posture at work.

Sitting Disease

The term sitting disease is a relatively new term. It refers to sitting for extended periods of time with little movement and poor posture, which results in multiple long term medical conditions, with chronic back pain being the most common. Even with a healthy level of exercise before or after work, the long periods of sitting can still cause health issues. Sitting disease is most often caused by the following:

  • Long periods without movement which can restrict blood flow to the spine.
  • Workstation or desk setup that causes neck strain, typically a result of monitors that aren’t at eye level.
  • Crossing your legs or ankles for long periods which can cause misalignment of the hips.
  • Slouching over with a rounded back, putting additional stress on your back.

Improving Work Ergonomics to Reduce Neck and Back Pain

Work ergonomics refers to fitting your job to your body and what it needs. For office work, this usually entails adjusting your workstation, desk, computer, chair, and your working habits to better fit your body. Improving work ergonomics generally focuses on keeping your body in a neutral position, not slouching over, and not leaning back too far. Some general tips to improve your work ergonomics include:

  • Rest with your feet flat on the ground and limit the amount of time with your feet or ankles crossed.
  • Keep your back against the back of your chair.
  • Make use of the lumbar support on your chair to help prevent slouching.
  • Adjust your computer monitors so that they’re at eye level, making sure that you’re not always looking down or up on them, which can strain the neck.

Take Breaks

Even with an improved work ergonomics, it is still important to take breaks, stretch, move around, stretch your legs, and promote blood flow. Research has revealed that taking a break about every half hour can significantly reduce the potential for health risks associated with prolonged sitting.

Listen to What Your Body Tells You

Awareness is another key factor in preventing chronic neck and back problems. If your body starts to become sore or stiff, analyze your work ergonomics. Maybe something needs adjusted, or maybe you just need more breaks. Try adjusting and see if the soreness or stiffness improves. If you suffer from chronic neck or back pain, schedule an appointment with your spine specialist to diagnose and recommend treatment to improve your neck and back.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

5 Common Summer Injuries for Kids and How to Prevent Them

Article featured on MedStar Health

Along with all of the outdoor fun comes more opportunity for activity-related injury, especially if your kids have been less active while stay-at-home orders were in place.

In addition to nature-related injuries and illnesses, such as tick bites and sunburn, summer activities present more chances for broken bones, concussions, and other bumps and bruises. As sports medicine physicians, here are some of the most common summer injuries we see in warm weather months and how you can help prevent them at home.

Common summer injuries.

1. Bicycle injuries

Bike accidents are one of the most common summer injuries because the warmer weather presents more chances for you and your kids to ride together. But, a fall from a bike accident can be dangerous, resulting in cuts, scrapes, fractures, or concussions. If vehicles are involved, a bike crash could even be fatal.

Tips to prevent bicycle injuries: You can prevent severe head injuries from bike crashes by wearing a helmet. In fact, the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute suggests that wearing a helmet can reduce the risk of head and brain injury by up to 88% for both adults and children. Other protective gear, such as knee and elbow pads, can also help to minimize injury from falls. And, a properly-fitted helmet and padding can reduce your risk of injury from skateboard and scooter accidents as well.

2. Playground injuries

More free time on summer vacation means more time spent visiting the local park or backyard playground. Unfortunately, monkey bars, slides, and swings commonly cause fall-related fractures and head injuries over the summer, even if the equipment is properly maintained.

Tips to prevent playground injuries: Playground falls are inevitable, but choosing a playground built over soft surfaces can minimize the risk of severe injury. Avoid playgrounds on concrete or gravel and instead look for playgrounds that hover soft surfaces, like rubber or wood chips. Active supervision is also important, as you may be able to help prevent a fall if you’re within arms reach.

3. Trampoline injuries

Concussions and fractures are also common in the summer months as a result of jumping on a trampoline. Bloody noses, bumps, and bruises may not be as serious but they’re also a concern.

Tips to prevent trampoline injuries: Many trampoline injuries involve a collision between two or more people, so one of the best ways to minimize the risk of injury is to only allow one person to use the trampoline at a time. It’s also a great idea to attach a net around the outside of the trampoline to minimize falls.

4. Water injuries and drowning

Swimming in a pool, lake, or ocean is great exercise but water-related injuries can be fatal. Drowning is the second most common cause of death by unintentional injury from kids between the ages of one and four, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And, even good swimmers can get injured in and around water-related activities like diving, water sports, and boating.

Tips to prevent water injuries and drowning: Adult supervision is the most effective way to prevent drowning accidents, whether you’re at the pool or in open water. Stay within arms reach when your kids are in or around the pool. If the pool is not fenced in, be sure to cover it when it is not being used. If your family is on a boat participating in or watching water sports, make sure everyone wears a Coast Guard-approved life jacket, even if you’re a good swimmer.

5. Overuse injuries

While school sports may take a break from practices during the summer, travel teams or sports camps are in full swing. Overuse injuries, such as tendonitis or Osgood-Schlatter disease in the knee, can be painful and prevent your kids from fully participating in their sports. Shoulder and elbow overuse injuries are especially common in baseball players and pitchers because of the repetitive throwing motion.

Tips to prevent overuse injuries: One of the best ways to minimize overuse injuries in kids and teenagers is to encourage them to play more than one sport. Cross-training can help prevent common ligament injuries in the knee, shoulder, and elbow. Additionally, if your child has been sedentary, it’s important to help them gradually return to their sports by slowly increasing the frequency and duration of their participation.

When to see a doctor for a summer injury

If you suspect a head injury of any kind, call a medical professional to determine if they need additional care. It’s always better to seek care sooner rather than later.

If your child had an activity-related fall, you should seek medical care if they are:

  • Limping
  • Unable to put use full range of motion in an extremity (e.g. arm or leg)
  • Experiencing pain or tenderness when pressure is applied to a joint
  • Having headaches or drowsy, as these could be signs of a concussion

Have a safe, injury-free summer!


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Orthopedic Soft Tissue Repair Market Projected to have a Stable Growth for the Next Few Years

Article featured on Orthogate
North America had the largest share in global orthopedic soft tissue repair market in 2014, attributed to the increase in sports injury cases due to high share of sports activity in this region.
A soft tissue injury is the damage of ligaments, muscles and tendons of hip, knee, shoulder and elbow joint. A soft tissue injury usually occurs from a strain, sprain and continuous use of a particular part of the body and it can result in swelling, pain, bruising and loss of function. To cure soft tissue injury, the soft tissue repair procedure is used. On any soft tissue injury, Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation (PRICE) principle should be immediately applied to minimize the soft tissue damage and to reduce inflammation caused by it. One of the methods to diagnose soft tissue damage is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
On the basis of surgeries, the global orthopedic soft tissue repair market can be broadly segmented as vaginal prolapse, achilles tendinosis repair, lateral epicondylitis, rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament and gluteal tendon. On the basis of applications, the global orthopedic soft tissue repair market can be broadly bifurcated as hernia repair, dental, dural repair, skin repair, vaginal sling procedures and breast reconstruction repair.
The rising trend towards safe and simple persistent surgeries and growth in number active lifestyle opting patients are driving the demand of the orthopedic soft tissue repair market. Moreover, with the increase in popularity of rough and energetic sports such as football, soccer and basketball, there had been a considerable increase in the number of soft tissue damages. Some of the factors driving the growth of orthopedic soft tissue repair market are rising geriatric population, increasing obesity rate, advanced medicinal technological advancements, and lack of substitutes.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

10 Ways to Move More in Everyday Life

Article featured on Healthline

It can feel overwhelming when you’re trying to make time for exercise. Here are some tips I give my physical therapy patients… and how I manage to keep myself moving. I get it. We’ve all said, “Who has time to exercise when you’re a…”

Just fill in the blank: working parent, working night shifts, entrepreneur, student, person who commutes, or parent who stays at home keeping children alive. You’re not alone in trying to figure out how to fit exercise into your day.
Over the past 11 years, I’ve realized the I’ll-work-out-later approach doesn’t work for me. I have to block time out of my day to exercise so I can stay sane and maintain my health and strength.
And here’s another tip: Try adding in a few bonus activities throughout the day and week to keep your body moving. Just a few extra minutes of movement here and there really do add up over time.
Here are 10 ways to move more during everyday life, without having to block more time out of your busy schedule!

1. Take the stairs

I know. This is so boring, and you’ve heard it a bajillion times. Yet, it’s one of the best tips for a reason.
Taking the stairs instead of the elevator increases your heart rate, helps with balance, and improves lower-extremity strength. If you’re feeling saucy and have a few minutes, you can even do some heel raises off the edge of a step for calf strength, or take the stairs two at a time.
Skip the elevator, your body and heart will thank you.

2. Incorporate walking meetings

If you work from home or have transitioned to virtual conference calls, schedule a walk during one call per day.
If you don’t need to be staring at a screen looking at spreadsheets, plug in your headphones, slip your phone in your pocket, and solve the world’s problems on a walk. It’s a great way to mix up your daily routine.
And if you work in an office, take your one-on-one meetings to go. Walking together enhances team bonding, and you may even come up with better ideas. Research shows walking boosts creativity and enhances mental acuity.

3. Lunge it up

I do this a lot, and I get funny looks sometimes, but hey — I’m a busy woman, and my time is precious!
When you’re shopping, try walking lunges down the supermarket aisles while holding onto the cart. The cart offers a good balance point, and you can get about 10–20 lunges in a single pass, depending on how long your supermarket’s aisles are. Go for it, it’s surprisingly fun!

4. Sit on an exercise ball

Swap out your office chair for a stability ball. This can help with back pain and help improve posture, and while sitting on the ball, you can do some gentle mobility stretches for your neck, pelvis, and spine.
Try a hula-hoop motion and tucking and untuck your pelvis to help fire up your core stabilizers. If you want to add in some abdominal work, you can also try seated marches or other exercises on the ball — all while sitting at your desk!

5. Park far away

While we need to be safe and alert to our surroundings, if you’re in a safe and well-lit area, consider parking further from the entrance of wherever you’re going. Adding in a few minutes of walking time here and there adds up over time and can increase your daily step count!

6. Have more sex

Yup, you’re welcome. Some older research states that sex burns calories at a rate of about 3.1 calories per minute for women and about 4.2 calories for men.
So although it’s not the same as a vigorous jog, you can (for sure) work up a sweat during sex. Have fun, try new positions and techniques, and bond with your partner all while moving more.

7. Foster a pet

Our local shelter and other adoption agencies are always looking for volunteers to help. Take the family to the shelter and volunteer to take a few dogs for a walk.
You get to increase your time outside, help a dog and your community, teach your kids about caring for others, and spend some quality family time being active and moving your body. It’s a win-win-win for all involved.

8. Have a dance party

Clear the furniture from the room and put on some tunes. You can do this while cooking dinner, folding laundry, or vacuuming.
Dancing is a fabulous way to burn calories and work on your balance and coordination. Plus, you can make it a game or contest with your kids. They need to learn about 80s rock, right? Put on some ACDC (or whatever makes you tap your feet) and get shakin’.

9. Switch up your game night

During your next family game night, swap out cards or board games for active games.
Here’s a list to jog your memory: hide and seek, kick the can, scavenger hunts, Twister, freeze dance, potato sack races, pin the tail on the donkey, musical chairs, hopscotch, jump rope, hula hoop contests, limbo… the games you once played as a kid are just as fun to play now.
Games like these can be played with people of any age, as well as indoors or outdoors. My family has a blast playing Pin the Tail on the Donkey and Freeze Frame Dance Party, and we all are sweaty and tired afterward.

10. Exercise or stretch during TV time

I know this goes beyond all tenets of “binge and chill,” but hear me out. Walk on the treadmill, use a stationary bike, stretch on the floor, use weights for upper- and full-body strengthening, or do Pilates during your next Netflix sesh.
If you watch a 30-minute show and move the whole time, that’s 30 minutes of exercise you didn’t have before! You can even limit it to when the commercials come on if that feels like a good place to start.
Keep your exercise stuff near your “binge-watching” place, and do some bodyweight exercises or even foam rolling during your show. Just a few reps of bicep curls, tricep presses, or arm raises with light hand weights will make a huge difference in your arm strength, posture, and well-being.
This is especially true for women, who are at a higher risk of osteoporosis. Incorporate weight training into your routine to keep your bones healthy and strong.

The bottom line

I hope these ideas will motivate and inspire you to get up and move a bit more throughout your day.
I know how difficult it is to maintain a good routine. It can seem overwhelming when you first start to exercise, but trying a few of these things will help.
Start small by adding in a few lunges here and there, a walking meeting once a week, or stairs a few times, and before you know it, you’ll be movin’ and groovin’ much more than you were before.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.
New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.
Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.
If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Exercises and Stretches For Hip Pain

Exercises and Stretches for Hip Pain

From Versus Arthritis

Here are some exercises designed to stretch, strengthen and stabilize the structures that support your hip.

It’s important to keep active – you should try to do the exercises that are suitable for you every day. Repeat each exercise between 5–10 times and try to do the whole set of exercises 2-3 times a day.

Start by exercising gradually and build up over time. Remember to carry on even when your hip is better to prevent your symptoms returning.

If you have any questions about exercising, ask your doctor.

It’s also a good idea to try to increase your general fitness by going for a regular walk or swim, this will strengthen your whole body – which helps support your hip. It can also improve your general health, fitness and outlook.

Simple stretching, strengthening and stabilising exercises

The following exercises are designed to stretch, strengthen and stabilise the structures that support your hip. These exercises for hip pain (PDF, 983 KB) are also available to download and keep.

It’s important not to overstretch yourself if you’re in pain. It’s normal to feel some aching in the muscles after exercising, but you should stop and seek advice if you have joint pain that lasts more than a few days.

If you’ve had a hip replacement you will probably be advised to take it easy for the first six weeks and not to push yourself too much. Ask your physiotherapist what exercises they recommend you should start with and how to do them.

You may feel slightly uncomfortable during or after exercise, but this should settle within 24 hours. It shouldn’t be painful. If you feel any sudden pain stop exercising and seek medical advice.

An illustration of someone marching on the spot.

Hip flexion (strengthening)

Hold onto a work surface and march on the spot to bring your knees up towards your chest alternately. Don’t bring your thigh above 90 degrees.

An illustration of someone standing whilst holding onto a table, moving their leg backwards and keeping it straight.

Hip extension (strengthening)

Move your leg backwards, keeping your knee straight. Clench your buttock tightly and hold for five seconds. Don’t lean forwards. Hold onto a chair or work surface for support.

An illustration of someone standing and holding onto a chair, lifting their leg sideways.

Hip abduction (strengthening)

Lift your leg sideways, being careful not to rotate the leg outwards. Hold for five seconds and bring it back slowly, keeping your body straight throughout. Hold onto a chair or work surface for support.

An illustration of someone standing whilst holding onto a table, bending their knee towards their bottom.

Heel to buttock exercise (strengthening)

Bend your knee to pull your heel up towards your bottom. Keep your knees in line and your kneecap pointing towards the floor.

An illustration of someone squatting down, bringing their knees towards their toes.

Mini squat (strengthening)

Squat down until your knees are above your toes. Hold for a count of five if possible. Hold on to a work surface for support if you need to.

An illustration of someone laying on their back with one bent leg and one straight leg with a towel under it's knee. They're raising their foot off the floor.

Short arc quadriceps exercise (strengthening)

Roll up a towel and place it under your knee. Keep the back of your thigh on the towel and straighten your knee to raise your foot off the floor. Hold for five seconds and then lower slowly.

An illustration of someone laying down with their legs straight, pulling their toes and ankles towards them whilst pushing their knees to the floor.

Quadriceps exercise (strengthening)

Pull your toes and ankles towards you, while keeping your leg straight and pushing your knee firmly against the floor. You should feel the tightness in the front of your leg. Hold for five seconds and relax. This exercise can be done from a sitting position as well if you find this more comfortable.

An illustration of someone laying on their back with their knees bent and hands under the small of their back. They're pulling their belly towards the floor.

Stomach exercise (strengthening/ stabilising)

Lie on your back with your knees bent. Put your hands under the small of your back and pull your belly button down towards the floor. Hold for 20.

An illustration of someone laying on their back with their feet to standing, lifting their pelvis and lower back off the floor.

Bridging

Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your pelvis and lower back off the floor. Hold the position for five seconds and then lower down slowly.

An illustration of someone laying on their back and pulling their knee toward their chest.

Knee lift (stretch)

Lie on your back. Pull each knee to your chest in turn, keeping the other leg straight. Take the movement up to the point you feel a stretch, hold for around 10 seconds and relax. Repeat 5-10 times. If this is difficult, try sliding your heel along the floor towards your bottom to begin with, and when this feels comfortable try lifting your knee.

An illustration of someone sitting with their knees bent and feet together, pressing their knees downwards.

External hip rotation (stretch)

Site you your knees bent and feet together. Press your knees down towards the floor using your hands as needed. Alternatively, lie on your back and part your knees, keeping your feet together. Take the movement up to the point you feel a stretch, hold for around 10 seconds and relax. Repeat 5-10 times.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Did You Know That Inactivity is Actually HARD On Your Knees?

Between working from home and being glued to the television watching the latest election updates, many of us are guilty of increased “couch potato” behavior lately.  And we’ve all heard of the dangers of sedentary lifestyles contributing to obesity, etc.,  but did you know that *not* moving can actually weaken your knees and increase your chances of osteoporosis?

Continue reading for more from Noyes Knee Institute and the Journal of Public Health.

From Noyes Knee Institute

Do you spend a lot of time sitting? Maybe you work at an office where most of your time is at your desk, or maybe when you’re at home, you prefer to rest on the couch instead of being on your feet. Many people live a mostly inactive lifestyle, but they might not realize that inactivity can be the reason why they experience increased joint pain.

Learn the reasons why inactivity can hurt your knees and what you can do to change it.

Weakens Your Knees

If you live a life or limited activity, your body adapts to that lack of motion. Essentially, when you aren’t using your legs muscles, ligaments, and joints for moderate levels of activity, you are losing them. Your knees become weaker as you require less of them.

One runner found that as she took time off running to rehabilitate an injury, she could not run after completing her recovery because of knee pain. She had to complete additional physical therapy because the rest had caused her to develop a condition called chondromalacia of the patella.

Essentially, her kneecap would not follow the proper range of motion because she had developed some weakness in the joint. It’s a common condition for people who are not active. Even something as simple as going up or down the stairs can make your knees ache.

If you spend your day sitting, you also experience pain in other areas that can also aggravate the knee. Your quadriceps become tight, which exert a pulling sensation on your knees.

You can help your knees feel better by focusing on flexibility. Stretch daily, and participate in joint-stabilizing exercises like yoga. Try to be more active during the day. Stand at your desk, or take time to walk around the office a few times. Use the stairs instead of the elevator.

Increases Your Risk of Arthritis Pain

If you start to experience joint pain as a result of arthritis, your first instinct is to rest more, because walking, running, biking, or other activities cause pain. However, resting when you have knee pain is often the worst solution.

Resting will cause the muscles that give the knee support to weaken. As a result, they become less able to bear your weight, which results in greater joint pain. Reduced strength in the knee joint also translates to reduced stability, which can increase your risk for accidents and make exercising even more difficult to do safely.

If you have arthritis or if you have a history of arthritis in your family, staying active is one way you can help to prevent it from getting worse. Ask a knee specialist for exercises that are safe and helpful for strengthening your knees without causing you too much pain during workouts.

Promotes Weight Gain

A sedentary lifestyle is often why people struggle to manage their weight. Gaining weight with age is common, and spending your days seated can make that problem worse. With every extra pound, the pressure on your knees increases by about four pounds. So, just 10 pounds of extra weight means 40 pounds of pressure on your knees.

All that stress naturally means that your knees start to hurt, and they can hurt even more when you try to be active again. Make sure you intentionally choose low impact exercise as first. Try a stationary bike or a brisk walk in supportive shoes to begin. Focus on losing weight through diet control.

After you lose some weight, you can increase your physical workouts if your doctor believes they will be safe. You might try incorporating some resistance training to really give your lower body some increased strength and stability, as long as you also spend time stretching and increasing your flexibility.

Increases Risk for Osteoporosis 

From the Daily Mail

Being a couch potato weakens your bones: Adults in their 60s face greater risk of fractures if they spend hours sitting down each day – but walking 10,000 steps each day helps

  • The study of 214 adults was published today in the Journal of Public Health
  • It is the first to show a link between a sedentary lifestyle and osteoporosis
  • Participants’ hips and spines were scanned to measure their bone density

A couch potato lifestyle leads to weaker bones in later life, particularly for men, researchers have found.

Experts discovered that men spent more time on average sitting still than women and therefore had weaker bones, particularly in their lower back.

But the new findings, conducted by academics from Durham and Newcastle universities, show that even just completing 10,000 steps a day can help to keep bones strong.

The study showed that people in their sixties who spent a lot of time sitting down had weaker bones which increased their risk of developing ‘fragility’ fractures.

It is well known that weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises are important for building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis.

The study, published in the Journal of Public Health, is the first to show that a sedentary lifestyle in men is associated with weaker bones and osteoporosis.

More than half a million fragility fractures – where a fracture occurs from a fall at standing height or less – happen each year in the UK. It is estimated that by 2025, that number will have gone up by 27 per cent.

Dr Karen Hind, of the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at Durham University, said: ‘We know that excessive sedentary time can lower someone’s metabolism which can lead to being overweight and Type 2 diabetes.

‘What we now know is that being inactive is also associated with lower bone strength and an increased risk of osteoporosis.

‘Osteoporosis is a disease that affects older people but by encouraging this age group to keep active, it will help improve their bone health.’

The research team followed 214 men and women, aged 62, from Newcastle University’s Thousand Families Study.

Each participant wore a monitor for seven consecutive days which measured their physical activity and sedentary time. The number of daily steps was also recorded, and then compared with public health recommendations.

The participants’ hips and spines were scanned to measure their bone density.

Participants involved in 150 minutes of light physical activity a week had better bone strength than the more sedentary participants, according to the findings.

The men who spent more than 84 minutes per day sitting still, compared to the average of 52 minutes, had 22 per cent lower bone density in their spine.

The researchers say the impact on their bone density is similar to that of smoking, which is also a risk factor for osteoporosis.

The economic and personal costs of osteoporosis are substantial – in the UK the direct costs of fragility fractures are estimated to be £4.4billion which includes £1.1billion for social care.

The participants all lived in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and Public Health England statistics indicate that the North East has the greatest proportion of physically inactive adults and the highest incidence of hip fractures compared to the rest of the UK.

The researchers said that the message from their findings is: stay active and reduce sedentary time.

They emphasised that the study shows that hitting the daily target of 10,000 steps and avoiding long periods of sedentary time will increase bone strength.

They say that even making daily lifestyle ‘hacks’ can make a difference – such as parking the car further away from the shopping centre or taking the stairs instead of the lift.

Dr Hind added: ‘Currently there are no specific guidelines for this age group to encourage light physical activity or to reduce sedentary time.

‘Yet, as people retire they are more likely to increase the time they spend watching television and reduce their daily step count.

‘It would be great to see initiatives that specifically target this group to increase their awareness of the importance of staying active and reducing the amount of time spent sitting still.’

Learn more about bone health


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.