Desk Job Dilemma: Preventing and Managing Back Pain at Work

Article featured on Orthapaedic Associates
If you have a desk job, you probably spend a lot of time sitting at your desk, working on your computer. But did you know that this can sometimes lead to back pain? Back pain can be a real nuisance, making it hard to focus on your work and enjoy your day.In this article, we will talk about some simple ways to prevent and manage back pain while you’re at work. These tips are easy to follow and will help you feel better in no time.

Tips for Preventing and Managing Back Pain

Whether you are working from home or in an office, taking steps to prevent and manage back pain is crucial for your comfort and well-being.

Here are some strategies and tips to help you maintain a healthy back while at your desk job:

1.  Ergonomic Workspace

Create an ergonomic workspace by adjusting your chair, keyboard, and monitor to the right height.

Use an ergonomic chair that supports your lower back and encourages proper posture. You can also position your computer monitor at eye level to avoid straining your neck.

2.  Proper Seating

Choose a chair with good lumbar support and adjust it to fit your body’s needs. Sit all the way back in your chair with your back straight and feet flat on the floor.

In addition, avoid crossing your legs for extended periods, as it can lead to poor posture.

3.  Regular Breaks and Stretching

Take short breaks every 30 minutes to stand up, stretch, or walk around briefly.

Incorporate simple stretching exercises into your day to relieve tension in your back, neck, and shoulders. You can try:

  • Gentle neck stretches
  • Shoulder rolls
  • Seated twists

4.  Stay Hydrated

Drink enough water throughout the day to keep your spinal discs lubricated and prevent stiffness.

5.  Use a Lumbar Support Pillow

Consider using a lumbar support pillow to maintain the natural curve of your lower back while sitting.

6.  Mind Your Feet

Ensure your feet are flat on the floor or use a footrest if they do not reach. Avoid crossing your legs for prolonged periods to maintain good posture.

7.  Maintain Regular Exercise

Engage in regular physical activity outside of work hours to strengthen your back muscles and improve overall posture. Activities like swimming, yoga, and walking are excellent choices for back health.

8.  Adjust Your Monitor

Position your computer monitor at eye level to prevent neck and upper back strain. Use monitor stands or adjust your chair’s height if necessary.

9.  Mindful Sitting

Practice mindful sitting by maintaining good posture throughout the day. Always try to:

  • Sit back in your chair
  • Keep your back straight
  • Relax your shoulders
  • Keep your elbows close to your body

In addition, try to avoid slouching or hunching forward.

10.  Take Microbreaks

In addition to regular breaks, incorporate microbreaks every 30 minutes. Stand up, stretch, or take a short walk around your workspace to prevent stiffness and maintain circulation in your back muscles.

By incorporating these strategies and tips into your daily routine, you can significantly reduce the risk of back pain and discomfort while working at your desk job.

Remember that small adjustments can lead to significant improvements in your back health and overall comfort.

When to Consider Seeing an Orthopedic Doctor

While back pain can often be managed with self-care and ergonomic improvements, there are instances when it is essential to consult an orthopedic doctor for professional guidance.

Here are some situations in which you should seriously consider seeking medical advice:

Persistent Pain

If your back pain persists for several weeks despite rest, home remedies, and over-the-counter pain relievers, it may be a sign that an underlying issue may be present.

Severe Pain

Intense and debilitating back pain that affects your daily activities and quality of life should not be ignored.

An orthopedic specialist can help identify the root cause and provide effective treatment options.

Tingling or Numbness

If you experience tingling or numbness in your legs or feet along with back pain, it could indicate nerve compression or other neurological concerns that require evaluation.

Leg Pain and Radiating Symptoms

Pain that radiates down your legs, commonly known as sciatica, can be indicative of herniated discs or spinal stenosis. An orthopedic doctor can diagnose and recommend appropriate treatments.

Difficulty Walking or Balancing

If your back pain makes it challenging to walk or maintain balance, it is a serious concern that should prompt a visit to an orthopedic specialist.

Loss of Bladder or Bowel Control

In rare but critical cases, back pain accompanied by loss of bladder or bowel control may signify a medical emergency. Seek immediate medical attention in such situations.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

8 Ways to Move More During the Workday


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

A majority of Americans spend long periods of time sitting down while at work. Having an improper posture day after day can put those people at risk of chronic back pain, disorders, or future injuries. Read on to learn more about improving your posture at work.

Sitting Disease

The term sitting disease is a relatively new term. It refers to sitting for extended periods of time with little movement and poor posture, which results in multiple long term medical conditions, with chronic back pain being the most common. Even with a healthy level of exercise before or after work, the long periods of sitting can still cause health issues. Sitting disease is most often caused by the following:

  • Long periods without movement which can restrict blood flow to the spine.
  • Workstation or desk setup that causes neck strain, typically a result of monitors that aren’t at eye level.
  • Crossing your legs or ankles for long periods which can cause misalignment of the hips.
  • Slouching over with a rounded back, putting additional stress on your back.

Improving Work Ergonomics to Reduce Neck and Back Pain

Work ergonomics refers to fitting your job to your body and what it needs. For office work, this usually entails adjusting your workstation, desk, computer, chair, and your working habits to better fit your body. Improving work ergonomics generally focuses on keeping your body in a neutral position, not slouching over, and not leaning back too far. Some general tips to improve your work ergonomics include:

  • Rest with your feet flat on the ground and limit the amount of time with your feet or ankles crossed.
  • Keep your back against the back of your chair.
  • Make use of the lumbar support on your chair to help prevent slouching.
  • Adjust your computer monitors so that they’re at eye level, making sure that you’re not always looking down or up on them, which can strain the neck.

Take Breaks

Even with an improved work ergonomics, it is still important to take breaks, stretch, move around, stretch your legs, and promote blood flow. Research has revealed that taking a break about every half hour can significantly reduce the potential for health risks associated with prolonged sitting.

Listen to What Your Body Tells You

Awareness is another key factor in preventing chronic neck and back problems. If your body starts to become sore or stiff, analyze your work ergonomics. Maybe something needs adjusted, or maybe you just need more breaks. Try adjusting and see if the soreness or stiffness improves. If you suffer from chronic neck or back pain, schedule an appointment with your spine specialist to diagnose and recommend treatment to improve your neck and back.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Work-from-Home Ergonomics 101: Setting Up Your Remote Office to Help Reduce Pain & Injury

From Rachel Pelta at FlexJobs

Since many of us are working at home right now (and weren’t expecting it), lots of people are improvising their “workstation.” For some, that means working at a desk, and for others, that means sitting on the couch or commandeering the kitchen table during work hours.

We’ve got some advice on how to set up an ergonomic workspace at home. While it’s best if you can buy the right equipment, that doesn’t mean you have to. Sometimes simple works, so we’ve included some DIY work-from-home ergonomic hacks you can use with things you’ve probably got at home.

Why Ergonomics Matter

The dictionary definition of ergonomics is, “an applied science concerned with designing and arranging things people use so that the people and things interact most efficiently and safely.”

Efficiently and safely are the important parts of the definition. Think about it like this: you’re sitting at your desk typing away, and you get a pain in your neck or your back. Suddenly, you’re not thinking about completing the task as much as you are getting rid of the pain.

Having an ergonomically optimized workspace helps you work “efficiently and safely.” By protecting your body from injury (or recurring pain), you’re better able to focus on your task, which, in turn, makes you a more efficient and productive worker.

How to Set Up An Ergonomic Workspace at Home

Setting up an ergonomically correct workspace at home will take a little bit of doing on your part. At the office, you probably have access to or can order, plenty of items to help you achieve the most ergonomic setup.

While you’re working at home during the pandemic, that may not be the case. You can’t run out to the office supply store and buy what you need. And, even if you can, you may not want to drop the money on it, or take the health risk.

So, focus on helping yourself maintain a neutral spine. Contrary to what you may think, a neutral spine isn’t one that is perfectly straight. A neutral spine is one that stays in its natural curved shape.

A neutral spine is basically an S-shape. That means at the top of your spine, near your neck, your spine curves in (toward your front). In the middle, your spine curves out, and your low back curves back in.

 A picture of a spine illustrating the natural S-curve

Image from Pixabay

Whether you stand or sit for long periods, this is the best position for your spine. It takes “less work” for you to maintain a neutral spine, meaning it’s not as hard on your muscles. As you set up your workspace, take a few moments to focus on how your back feels. Is it tight? Does the position feel “unnatural”? If so, you’re probably not in a neutral spine. Keep adjusting and testing until things feel more “neutral.”

Start with Your “Desk”

Using a real desk makes setting up a home office easier. However, given the unusual nature of many work-at-home situations right now, many people are using a “desk.” Whether it’s a dining room table, TV tray, or even a folding table, whatever your desk is right now, make sure it isn’t causing posture problems.

Specifically, your desk should fit your knees, feet, and thighs comfortably underneath. You shouldn’t feel that you have to press your legs together to fit, and your knees shouldn’t bang up against anything. If you can’t fit under the desk comfortably, try out a different “desk” until you find the right fit.

Get the Right Height

No matter what you choose as your “desk,” your keyboard and mouse should be at elbow height when you are seated. Sit at the desk, hold your arms naturally and comfortably at your sides, then bend your elbows. Hold out your arms (with your elbows just slightly in front of your body but still at your sides) as if you were typing. This is the proper height for the top of your work surface.

Some desks let you adjust the height of the desk (or keyboard tray). If you don’t have an adjustable desk or are improvising a desk, you can try some hacks. Use some books or a sturdy box to raise your work surface up. If your work surface is too high, adjust your chair up, or try sitting on a pillow or some books.

Get Your Computer Set

Thanks to its portability, laptops are a popular computing option. However, laptops are not very ergonomic. The main problem with a laptop is that the screen and the keyboard are connected, making true ergonomic placement of the laptop keyboard and screen impossible.

While working on a laptop for a short time is fine, using one for longer periods (like the full workday), will not do wonders for your body. However, there are things you can do to improve laptop ergonomics when you work on it for long periods. And, even if you use a desktop with a detached keyboard, mouse, and monitor, you still have to place everything correctly, so you don’t injure yourself.

Monitor Placement

Depending on how many monitors you use, you’ll need to place them at different points on your desk. However, there are a few things you should do, no matter how many monitors you use.

First, the top of the monitor should be at or slightly below your eye level. When you look at the middle of the screen, your eyes should look slightly down. You should be able to hold your neck straight and easily see the top third of the screen. If you find yourself bending your neck up or down, adjust the screen again.

If your monitor doesn’t adjust height (or you can’t raise it any more), consider propping the monitor up on a riser (or books) to achieve the right height. If the monitor is too high and won’t lower, adjust your chair up.

The monitor should be at least arm’s length from you. This lets you view the entire screen at once—meaning you won’t have to move your head from left to right.

If the screen is arm’s length away and you still can’t see what’s on screen, enlarge the text (or wear your glasses). Larger screens may need to be farther away than “arm’s length” for you to see everything properly. If your screen is already at the far edge of the desk (away from you), move your keyboard farther from the desk to achieve the right distance.

You may also need to adjust the tilt on your screen. If you can see the screen just fine when it’s straight, leave it. However, you will likely need to angle the screen to reduce glare and achieve proper head positioning. The top will push away from you, and the bottom will come toward you.

Most people tilt the screen back between 10 and 20 degrees. However, if you wear bifocals, you may need to adjust the tilt by 30 to 40 degrees. This helps you use your bifocal lenses the right way without craning your neck.

Lastly, try to avoid direct light on the monitor. No matter how you tilt the screen, you’ll have a harsh glare that can be hard on the eyes. Try to keep the lighting to the side of the screen for indirect (and less harsh) lighting.

Which Monitor Where

Depending on how many monitors you use, you’ll need to place them differently.

One screen: center it in front of you.

one screen setup for work-from-home ergonomics

Image from Pixabay

Two screens: line the screens up side by side without a gap. If you use the two monitors equally, then they should meet in the middle of your sightline (when your head is straight). If you use one more than the other, offset the less used monitor to the side. Tilt the screens slightly in, like this:

Image from Pixabay

Three screens: the main monitor should be in the middle. The other two should be one each side of the main monitor with no gap and pointed slightly in.

three screens remote work ergonomics

Image from Bigstock

Laptop Screen

When you use a laptop, you should use the same ergonomic setup for the screen. This means propping your laptop up on something to bring the top of the screen to eye level. Of course, this makes it harder to type, which is why you should use an external keyboard and mouse when you must use a laptop for extended periods.

Keyboard Placement

Placing your keyboard at elbow height is only the beginning of proper keyboard ergonomics. To ensure you’ve got the right keyboard height, place the keyboard on your work surface then try to type a few lines. As you type, your wrists should remain straight, and your upper arms should stay close to your body, without you forcing it.

With the height correct, adjust the keyboard to the proper distance. You don’t want the keyboard too close to you, and you don’t want to overreach. As you type, your elbows should hang naturally by your sides without discomfort. Consider using a wrist rest to help achieve proper keyboard placement. If you don’t have one, a sock filled with rice will do, as will a rolled-up towel.

Use a keyboard that is either flat or has a “negative tilt.” Many keyboards tilt “up,” meaning the top row of the keyboard is raised. This forces your wrists to bend up as you type and can cause discomfort.

A flat keyboard is better since it helps you hold your wrists straight. A negative tilt keyboard tilts away from you (meaning the bottom row of the keyboard is raised) and also helps promote better wrist placement.

Mouse Placement

Your mouse should be near the keyboard and easy to reach without overextending any part of your body. In general, this means placing the mouse by your dominant hand, slightly in front of, and next to the keyboard like this:

A picture that demonstrates proper mouse placement

Image from Pixabay

In general, you should use a keyboard without an attached numeric keypad. This helps you keep the mouse at the proper height and within easy reach while also keeping the keyboard centered.

Consider getting a mouse riser. Similar to a keyboard or monitor riser, this is something you can attach to your desk or keyboard tray to raise the mouse to the proper height without taking up desk space or forcing the keyboard off-center.

Sit Pretty

If you’ve got an adjustable office chair, that’s great. Your work-from-home ergonomics are ahead of the game. But, just because you have an adjustable office chair, that doesn’t mean it’s adjusted correctly. And if you can’t get your hands on an office chair, don’t worry. There are plenty of ways to make a kitchen or dining room chair ergonomically awesome.

Support Your Spine

No matter what kind of chair you use, you want something that will support your spine’s natural S-shape. To do that, you need to sit properly. So, start at the bottom and work your way up.

As you sit in the chair, your feet should be flat on the floor. Make sure you’re sitting evenly on your bottom and not tilting to one side or the other. Your thighs should be parallel to the floor (or your knees at about hip height).

The problem is that once you’ve adjusted your chair to the right height, your arms may not be at the right height for the keyboard. And, of course, your standard kitchen chair isn’t adjustable.

To create the perfect work throne, you may need to get creative. For example, if you need a higher chair so you can reach the keyboard, your feet may not rest on the floor. So, try out some shoes (flat heels only!) to see if some combination of chair height and shoes gives you the proper support for your feet. If shoes are out, try a footrest, step stool, or even a pile of books to achieve the right sitting posture.

An office chair may have a back with lower back support that encourages your spine’s natural curves. Your kitchen chair probably does not. To achieve a neutral spine, try a rolled-up towel or small pillow in the small of your back.

To Stand or Not to Stand

For some, a standing desk is the ideal combination of work and exercise—without the trip to the gym. One study found that working at a standing desk burns about 88 calories an hour. That’s not much, but it is slightly better than sitting and typing, which burns 80 calories an hour.

Calorie blasting aside, some people like a standing desk because it’s something different, or it gives their back a rest from sitting in a chair all day. However, if you are going to use a standing desk, be aware that it does come with its own ergonomic risks.

If you’re not used to standing all day, don’t jump into the first day of a standing desk by using it for eight hours straight! Start with 30 minutes a day and gradually increase your standing time. This decreases the risk that you might develop leg, foot, or, you guessed it, back pain.

When you work at a standing desk, the same rules about keyboard and mouse placement apply, so make sure you aren’t working at a standing desk that’s too tall or short for you.

Lastly, make sure you can stand up straight. Again, this doesn’t mean with a ramrod-straight spine. You need to stand with a neutral spine. That means standing at a desk, not necessarily a high counter.

Just like sitting at a desk, you need a standing desk (or other high surface), that lets you get the right distance away from your keyboard and screen. Some counters, like your kitchen counter, have a toe kick, the part under the cabinet that lets you stick your toes under while you work.

However, if the toe kick isn’t deep enough, you may find yourself too far from the desk. That, in turn, will mean you’re overextending your arms or leaning too far forward, which could put pressure on your spine. And, if you’re using an external monitor, if you don’t get the screen placed right, you may crane your neck or lean back without realizing it.

Keep a watchful eye on your posture when you work at a standing desk. If you’re feeling pain, stop and examine how you’re positioned and adjust it. The last thing you want is to not be able to sit or stand while you work.

Successfully (and Ergonomically) Working Remotely

Sure, working on the couch sounds like a dream. But, after a few days, you might be fighting aches. Back pain, leg pain, even neck pain are all possible. Take the time to carefully consider your home-office ergonomics when working remotely. Your back, your arms, and every other part of your body will thank you.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.